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Ana Kova

Good morning.

Game on... and off

The biggest soccer match in the world is on Sunday. Liverpool and Manchester United are historic rivals in England, two of the highest-earning teams, and are American-owned. However, their financial situations, reflecting their performances on the field, are very different.

Debt £511m but dividends galore: the Glazers’ legacy at Manchester United | David Conn

Soccer isn’t quite as big a business as the hype merchants would have us believe. Despite stratospheric wages for top players, and billions in TV money, a club like Manchester United, England’s biggest, only has a market cap of $2.6bn. Nevertheless, sports teams matter a lot more to huge numbers of people

Soccer isn’t quite as big a business as the hype merchants would have us believe. Despite stratospheric wages for top players, and billions in TV money, a club like Manchester United, England’s biggest, only has a market cap of $2.6bn. Nevertheless, sports teams matter a lot more to huge numbers of people than their positions on stock exchanges. Liverpool and Manchester United have fans across the world, far beyond their roots in northwest England.

The US presidency

The next G7 will be held at a Trump resort. The White House announced the 2020 summit will take place at Trump National Doral golf resort near Miami, Reuters reports.

Trump will host G7 summit next year at one of his own properties: White House official

As we reported last month, if any other federal employee were to make this deal, they would likely be prosecuted: https://qz.com/1706517/trumps-bid-to-bring-g7-to-his-doral-resort-is-probably-illegal/

Allowing this to happen flies in the face of the Emoluments Clause. I don't care if they make you believe it will save money. His Doral property, like a lot of his properties, aren't doing well, and having taxpayers pay to bail out his properties is insanity.

It doesn't matter if it's done at cost

Allowing this to happen flies in the face of the Emoluments Clause. I don't care if they make you believe it will save money. His Doral property, like a lot of his properties, aren't doing well, and having taxpayers pay to bail out his properties is insanity.

It doesn't matter if it's done at cost. This is still using federal dollars to keep his properties above water. It's all he cares about. If you don't believe me, when was the last time he talked about the GLWA? Or Feral Hogs invading new states? Or fires out west? Only when he thinks it averts attention to something else he doesn't want to talk about.

The optics here don’t look good. Mulvaney may say that it’s being held at cost but unless they open up the books why must we believe them. More than anything this is an endorsement of any leader who uses their position to profit and that has long term ramifications.

How can you know which Trump impeachment polls to believe? As with all polling, the results depend to some extent on who is polled, what they are asked, and when.

How to know which Trump impeachment polls to believe

Here’s what this comes down to:

(1). Is national support for impeachment and removal north of 70%?

(2). Is GOP support north of 50%?

(3). Support for impeachment in the key Senate races in 2020.

(4). Data on whether Congressional Republicans are better off with Trump at the top of the ticket or

Here’s what this comes down to:

(1). Is national support for impeachment and removal north of 70%?

(2). Is GOP support north of 50%?

(3). Support for impeachment in the key Senate races in 2020.

(4). Data on whether Congressional Republicans are better off with Trump at the top of the ticket or someone else (like Romney).

This is a mathematical question and nothing else.

The new TV

What comes after the iPhone?

Getting in the way

Meat-free around the world

You'll never guess the world’s best city for vegan-friendly dining. A surprising winner emerges in a new ranking of the top 10 cities for vegan-friendly restaurants.

Guess the world’s best city for vegan-friendly dining! No, try again

On the face of it Dublin would appear to be a shock result, but that's only if you consider a high rate of vegan-friendly restaurants to be a product exclusively of social, cultural and/or religious concentrations that "break through" the norm to establish a new norm.

This theory tends to focus on

On the face of it Dublin would appear to be a shock result, but that's only if you consider a high rate of vegan-friendly restaurants to be a product exclusively of social, cultural and/or religious concentrations that "break through" the norm to establish a new norm.

This theory tends to focus on the notion of "changing minds" among existing populations -- a traditional cultural understanding of the focus of many vegan practitioners -- rather than any analysis of the increasing impact of global population movements and the massively increased interconnection of cities in particular around the planet.

In the case of Dublin, the surprised narrative would have us understand it to be a city still very much in the traditional stereotypical Irish model -- a mix of Catholicism, traditional pub food, Guinness pints and some of the finest of the melancholy arts. In this stage, it is no wonder anyone would be surprised that the opening of a single vegan restaurant, let alone a thriving vegan-friendly culture is a shock to all.

Pints dropped. Instant titterring among groups of elderly women. Elderly men slowly shake their heads and look to the sky. A young Irish babe begins to wail and somewhere in the background a rather frail looking priest in full traditional black cassock and collar faints from the intensity of the experience.

It's an easy narrative and all-to-unfortunately accepted one among far too many when thinking of Dublin.

But there's quite a different one that's clear to many who have watched Dublin transform in the past decades from a local capital of a nation struggling to find it's feet in the shadows of its former imperial masters to one of the major global nodes of trans-national economic, tech, design and culture systems.

As this node, Dublin had seen the world come to it -- to exchange ideas, cultures, technologies and, at the end of the day, populations. While the public mindset of what Dublin is may still be easily lured into traditional archaic stereotypes, the reality is that Dublin's vegan-friendly ranking is nothing more than a reflection of its place among the increasingly tight network of global cities.

We need to start thinking in terms of global culture and networks when we talk about cities that are willing to engage directly in these global networks. Cities will continue to have their own unique flavours, but they will also be drawing upon each other in ways we are not fully appreciating. Reinterpreting our stereotypical assumptions about why city data has the results it does will be essential if we are to effectively understand how our major global urban areas are continuing to evolve.

Fun read! But if it is baed on really fun article. I love the reveal. But, if it is based on Tripadvisor, what about cities that are not as active?

The future of work

The world in 50 years

What will we eat? “A lot more plants,” says scientist and author Bill Nye. Check out the predictions from artist and activist Mai Khôi, Andreessen Horowitz general partner Vijay Pande, transhumanist Zoltan Istvan, and more thought leaders.

The World in 50 Years: What will we eat?

Cool insights, but a lot of wild ideas. Keep in mind, 50 years ago was 1970. The world has not changed that frickin’ much.

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout. Radical transformation. Super radical!

Come back soon!

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Andrew Sullivan: The Appeasement of Donald Trump

Andrew Sullivan: The Appeasement of Donald Trump

Read more on Intelligencer

From Our Members

  • Trump is certainly a uniquely dangerous president, but the threat he poses to the general rule of law would be negligible if not for the bipartisan cowardice and greed of Congress.

    “More to the point, [Trump] has refused to protect the American election system from the malevolent designs of a foreign

    Trump is certainly a uniquely dangerous president, but the threat he poses to the general rule of law would be negligible if not for the bipartisan cowardice and greed of Congress.

    “More to the point, [Trump] has refused to protect the American election system from the malevolent designs of a foreign enemy. Thanks to leaks, we know now that he has been doing this for the last two years, even though other members of the administration, like Kirstjen Nielsen, were prepared to take strong, defensive measures. Why? Because any mention of Russian interference reminds him of the question of his legitimacy, and that enrages him. Which is to say he has openly put his personal amour propre before the interests of every citizen in this country who wants to preserve our electoral integrity. This alone is an unambiguously impeachable offense....

    The GOP will not stand in the way of strongman rule, and will, in fact, try to buttress it. Even when Trump usurped the Congress’s power of the purse by declaring a fake national emergency, 182 out of 195 Republican House members eagerly backed him, surrendering their constitutional power in favor of Trump’s diktat. Just look at that sad sack, Lindsey Graham. He’s a man who insisted that perjury in a civil suit on sexual harassment was impeachable — and led the prosecution in the Senate trial of president Clinton no less — but that dangling pardons, intimidating witnesses, attempting to fire a special prosecutor, and threatening ‘the integrity of the justice system,’ in Mueller’s devastating words, is no big deal....

    The House Speaker, for her part, reacted to a report outlining ten cases of obstruction of justice (ten more than Clinton was accused of) by immediately dissing the idea of impeachment.... I can fully understand taking your time. No one is asking for an impeachment vote yet — just hearings including Trump officials who spoke with Mueller, in a consideration of impeachment. The Dems too often assume a defensive crouch, even when our Constitution is at stake.... They are beginning to wake up, but if a president wantonly obstructs justice and the opposition party immediately worries about the political cost of impeachment, we’re in deep trouble....

    Trump didn’t invent the powers he is now abusing. The slow accretion of powers vested in the executive have been growing for quite a while, from the Second World War onward into the Cold War. But the 21st century has broken new ground. We know, for example, that the last president once stated he could not unilaterally change immigration law to prevent Dreamers from being deported because he is ‘not a king,’ and then, in his second term, went ahead and did it anyway. We know he launched a new war against ISIS in 2015 based on the Authorization for the Use of Military Force of 2001 because the Congress abdicated its constitutional duty to declare war. What Trump demonstrates is that a savvy demagogue with one party’s cultlike support can use these extraordinary powers to install a version of a strongman presidency in the model of Erdogan in Turkey or Orban in Hungary.”