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Measles is an early warning sign for outbreaks of more serious diseases

By Popular Science

We’re not even four full months into 2019 and it’s already the worst year for measles in the United States since 1994. All over the world, in fact, places that had previously eliminated or drasticaRead full story

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  • Sonya Jackson
    Sonya JacksonproFounder at Mantra for Good

    Important article. “Measles has been a disease of high burden historically, and as recently as 2000, an estimated 733,000 individuals, mainly children, died from complications of measles.” This is not only about vaccine resistant parents. Globally, vaccination rates have flatlined over the past few years.

  • My sister and I both had the German measles as children because we were born on an island that did not vaccinate effectively. The amount of people who believe that vaccinations are not necessary is astounding, and they all seem to be getting this misinformation from each other. It’s sort of like a fools validation.

  • Max Lockie
    Max LockiePlatform Editor at Quartz

    This is the article I needed to read. In the back of my mind I've been wondering if the measles really are *that* bad - basically just chicken pox right? Nope!

  • Dr Gail Barnes
    Dr Gail BarnesPartner at Personify LLC

    The current spike in measles was entirely predictable. And entirely preventable. It's not a question of which disease will be the new measles. It's a case of when.

  • John Gray
    John GrayFormer Banker Risk Management

    I have been fortunate in having doctors that university professors. The one thing that scares them is when the next pandemic will occur. Not if when.

    They also explained that it will be the weakest who will probably die. The current outbreak of measles weakens the population which could allow opportunistic diseases to flourish. I don't know medicine but I did know the doctor who explained it. Perhaps some of the other commenters who are scientists can tell me I got it wrong .l don't like being wrong

    I have been fortunate in having doctors that university professors. The one thing that scares them is when the next pandemic will occur. Not if when.

    They also explained that it will be the weakest who will probably die. The current outbreak of measles weakens the population which could allow opportunistic diseases to flourish. I don't know medicine but I did know the doctor who explained it. Perhaps some of the other commenters who are scientists can tell me I got it wrong .l don't like being wrong in public but in this case I hope I am.

  • Such a must read article. It baffles me how could someone skip on vaccination just because they feel it's irrelevant...

  • Tina Boat
    Tina Boat

    I have said it before in this platform, vaccinate your children. One more article, in Popular Science no less talking about the necessity of vaccination. Does it take our children dying to make us see the light? The last I had heard there was a young adult in the hospital in a comma due to measles. Please, as a person who lived before vaccines and can remember the terrible results, vaccinate and don't regret.

  • Weiyee IN
    Weiyee INChief Strategy Officer

    Maintaining or achieving "full herd immunity" or "community immunity" as a barrier for a disease to spread because there are so few susceptible people left to infect has always been statistically difficult. There are always those in the community, people with cancer, very young children, or those that have intolerance or immune diseases that are not able to be vaccinated. Add to those the ones that are either unwilling or unreachable, and the percentages always come close to a risk threshold for

    Maintaining or achieving "full herd immunity" or "community immunity" as a barrier for a disease to spread because there are so few susceptible people left to infect has always been statistically difficult. There are always those in the community, people with cancer, very young children, or those that have intolerance or immune diseases that are not able to be vaccinated. Add to those the ones that are either unwilling or unreachable, and the percentages always come close to a risk threshold for transmission. Couple that with the increasing urbanization and changes in mass transportation, and a cluster concentration is created and contagion risk is elevated.

  • Kalesh Menon
    Kalesh MenonFinance Controller at Ingredion Thailand

    I am quite surprised to read about push back on vaccination on a developed economy like US. For India, it has been a struggle to convince and also to reach the vaccines to the population at large. Considering the geographic diversity and the dispersed population, I believe India has done a good job and one of the key factors to this success would be the communication. Indian government has been very innovative and also persistent to spread awareness about benefits and necessity of vaccines to the

    I am quite surprised to read about push back on vaccination on a developed economy like US. For India, it has been a struggle to convince and also to reach the vaccines to the population at large. Considering the geographic diversity and the dispersed population, I believe India has done a good job and one of the key factors to this success would be the communication. Indian government has been very innovative and also persistent to spread awareness about benefits and necessity of vaccines to the masses.

    Of course we may not up there with the developed countries in terms of execution but I believe creating awareness is the key to success for a vaccination drive.

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