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Uber and Lyft drivers are planning a massive strike this week over work conditions and pay rates

By Tech Insider

Drivers for ride-share companies Uber and Lyft are planning strikes this week in several cities as the controversy around the two companies' massive IPOs heat up. The strike comes ahead of Uber's IRead full story

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  • (1). If driving for Uber and Lyft were worse than driving a taxi or doing something else, there wouldn’t be so many people wanting the job.

    (2). Some drivers should be treated as employees (anyone working full time) and some as independent contractors (anyone working part time). There’s no one size fits all solution.

    (3). Drivers and all sharing economy workers should have access to portable benefits that work with any platform. Ironically, labor has been the biggest opponent to this (and red

    (1). If driving for Uber and Lyft were worse than driving a taxi or doing something else, there wouldn’t be so many people wanting the job.

    (2). Some drivers should be treated as employees (anyone working full time) and some as independent contractors (anyone working part time). There’s no one size fits all solution.

    (3). Drivers and all sharing economy workers should have access to portable benefits that work with any platform. Ironically, labor has been the biggest opponent to this (and red states like TX, FL, AZ and others have legalized it).

  • One of a zillion reasons why we need unions to better advocate for better wages, benefits, and workers rights.

  • Uber and Lyft need to sail these waters carefully because they are supply constrained. Meaning finding drivers is increasingly difficult and the cost of obtaining each incremental driver is rising. It’s easy for the media to run with the demand side risks on the customer front from competition and what not, but demand is less of a problem for Uber than supply over the long-term.

  • We’ve been under paying for Uber and Lyft. Drivers don’t make money and neither do they. That can’t go on forever. We love it because it’s cheap and easy. But eventually we’re going to have to pay for it.

  • Just learnt that in India, Uber drivers earn 7.8 × min wage vs 1.7x in the US

  • With all the controversy why do some investors think these are great companies?

  • A companion piece to this should be this WSJ article about how sub 4% unemployment is an existential threat to the 1099 economy: https://share.qz.com/news/2421323/

    Is it possible that all of these companies are only viable during a period of slow recovery after a recession?

  • Environmental social governance is very much about stakeholders across the entire ecosystem and value chain. In today's age, and with the emergence of the gig economy, and the semantic economy, participants in the value chain include all stakeholders including rideshare drivers regardless if they are employees or not. Ultimately strikes by significant stakeholders will create pressure on investors, especially the ones that are focused on sustainability. It would be prudent for the companies to address these issues sooner than later.

  • Timed with Uber’s IPO and given Dara Khosrowshahi declined Travis Kalanick request to appear to ring the bell on the NYSE Friday, maybe more protests are coming...

  • Pricing must focus on sustainable wages and growth opportunities for the employees.

  • A driver says “they should treat us with respect. “ I think this is essence of their voice.

  • The only way to achieve this is to limit the number of drivers and stop hiring more drivers in all cities. Add shift rotating plan and start offering those benefits. Let’s look at Amazon Flex as an example, they offer delivery blocks which are typically 2-4 hours and get paid in the fixed rate between £12 - £15 per hour.

  • A tricky area, the companies are ultimately treading water while their own ‘surge’ issues are at play. It makes sense to keep drivers at arms’ length for compensation + benefits for purely financial gain but for longevity + grand scale satisfaction from not only drivers but also consumers, it doesn’t make sense.

    One of the issues w/ a successful venture is that while some things work initially, it’s still growing and growth means change is required in order to continue to be successful. We didn’t

    A tricky area, the companies are ultimately treading water while their own ‘surge’ issues are at play. It makes sense to keep drivers at arms’ length for compensation + benefits for purely financial gain but for longevity + grand scale satisfaction from not only drivers but also consumers, it doesn’t make sense.

    One of the issues w/ a successful venture is that while some things work initially, it’s still growing and growth means change is required in order to continue to be successful. We didn’t always have the expectation of benefits but as businesses progressed, it became the norm.

    Now we’ve come to that grey area of make workers happy or make investors happy and it’s time for decisions to be made.

  • The problem for the drivers is competition. Uber can’t raise prices because they would lose market share to Lyft and vice versa. The only real solution to raise pay for drivers is regulation of the industry. The strike should be against the Taxi Commission in each city to force them to regulate rates.

  • Last night, I rode from Brooklyn to Manhattan with a 3 year Uber veteran who raved about the great opportunity to earn well and live well. He consciously abandoned his prior profession of pediatric physical therapy because Uber pays better and affords him much higher personal autonomy. I don’t think he’ll be striking here in NYC.

  • So get an actual job and stop being lazy

  • Reports that in London they were now on less than minimum wage should concern Uber and Lycra. You can’t run a business with unhappy employees...

  • I've long resisted Uber/Lyft because unions. This is exciting and loong overdue.

  • And then Uber will buy a whole bunch of autonomous cars and there will be no more drivers...

  • This will be an interesting attempt to shift the power dynamic

  • Lyft short selling is a sign of things to come

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