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Top China Trade Negotiator to Visit U.S. to Face Tariff Threat

By Bloomberg

(Bloomberg) -- China’s top trade negotiator Liu He will visit the U.S. this week for a new round of high-wire talks, in a sign Beijing is battling to keep negotiations on track after President Donald Trump ratcheted up pressure with plans to raise tariffs on Chinese goods Friday

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  • The problem is the president has a track record at this point. Think of North Korea: he made maximal threats and threatened war, only to become best friends with Kim without receiving any meaningful concessions. You can’t blame China for believing they can get away with a sweat heart deal.

  • John Gray
    John GrayFormer Banker Risk Management

    China is dealing from strength and despite the rhetoric in a trade war with China there are no winners. Further China holds over 1 trillion dollars of US debt and who knows how much of other countries. Threatening China is like insulting your banker it is very unhealthy.

  • Weiyee IN
    Weiyee INChief Strategy Officer

    It is an interesting maneuver and a very risky one playing chicken with China especially since one of the most contentious issues in the current negotiations is about the US wanting to retain the right to unilaterally re-impose tariffs if the US feels that China is reneging on the understanding of the current deal. Very difficult to believe that China would allow a unilateral back door for tariffs. Also very difficult to believe that the United States would impose those and additional tariffs as it could be deleterious to the economy.

  • Max Lockie
    Max LockiePlatform Editor at Quartz

    I saw Axios' Jonathan Swan on TV say that China has been backsliding away from aspects of a trade deal that US negotiatiors had already considered settled.

    It's also interesting to think about these tariffs as inducing artificial inflation on some of the sections of the consumer economy that have been deflationary (I think) since the crisis (goods from China).

  • Unless there is explicitly outlined, clearly codified, as well as actual enforcement mechanisms on the issues of intellectual property theft and forced technology transfer; there isn’t much to talk about. It is, and continues to be the issue of greatest long term economic importance between the US and China.

    If one is unwilling to walk away, or use the stick when called for, it isn’t a negotiation. There is zero reason for Washington to genuflect before Beijing. If the roles were reversed on these

    Unless there is explicitly outlined, clearly codified, as well as actual enforcement mechanisms on the issues of intellectual property theft and forced technology transfer; there isn’t much to talk about. It is, and continues to be the issue of greatest long term economic importance between the US and China.

    If one is unwilling to walk away, or use the stick when called for, it isn’t a negotiation. There is zero reason for Washington to genuflect before Beijing. If the roles were reversed on these issues, they would be no more accepting of said status quo.

  • Donald Gilmore
    Donald Gilmore

    So what ?

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