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Alessandro Cripsta

Good morning.

No longer the final frontier

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

What comes after the iPhone?

Diversity in the workplace

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

Up, up, and away

This is the worst time to be excited about supersonic flight. The technology is improving, but our political climate doesn't support developing yet another way to trash the planet.

This is the worst time to be excited about supersonic flight

Some people might argue we've really not had a transportation revolution for a long time. When I was born in the 1970s we already had supersonic jets. We could fly New York to London in 3-4 hours. The record for that flight was 2 hours and 53 minutes. Today it takes 5-6 hours, so it can be twice as slow

Some people might argue we've really not had a transportation revolution for a long time. When I was born in the 1970s we already had supersonic jets. We could fly New York to London in 3-4 hours. The record for that flight was 2 hours and 53 minutes. Today it takes 5-6 hours, so it can be twice as slow. In fact, when we look at transportation today, not a lot has changed in my lifetime. Commercial jets started back in the late 1950s. Fast trains have been around a long time as well - the Japanese Shinkansen started in 1964 at speeds above 200 kmh. And of course, automobiles have been looking pretty similar for a long long time. Karl Benz invented the modern car in 1886. Then we moved to mass production in 1913. By 1949 the Jaguar XK120 could reach speeds over 200kmh. Its kind of funny that we always assume there has been so much ground-braking innovation in every field.

Anyway, that said, we are fast approaching a new Transportation revolution. This is be the advent of driverless cars, a new type of high speed trains (the hyperloop) which is more like firing a bullet in a tunnel and also supersonic and hypersonic aviation.

The problem with supersonic is noise and pollution. There are some firms making supersonic planes with much less noise. So the real issue is pollution. According to this article:

"By 2035, according to a January ICCT paper, we might have 2,000 supersonic aircrafts, taking around 5,000 flights a day. (At the moment, there are over 100,000 subsonic flights daily.) Each year, this fleet of planes would emit approximately 100 million metric tons of CO2 per year. In context, that’s roughly the annual combined emissions of American, Delta, and Southwest Airlines, or approximately 20% of aviation’s entire carbon budget worldwide."

It's a really serious issue as this article suggests. Boom Technologies, a pioneer in the supersonic field, are saying one should actually compare the carbon footprint of business class seats on a 747 or regular jet vs. their supersonic aircraft. My personal suspicion is that new technologies will be discovered to lower the carbon footprint further. Boom is already experimenting with carbon capture technology. Expect more to come as the pressure mounts. In additional by the end of the 2020s we will see commercial electric jets. So aviation will finally join the new Transportation Revolution.

Painting, dating, and gaming

The world in 50 years

What will we eat? “A lot more plants,” says scientist and author Bill Nye. Check out the predictions from artist and activist Mai Khôi, Andreessen Horowitz general partner Vijay Pande, transhumanist Zoltan Istvan, and more thought leaders.

The World in 50 Years: What will we eat?

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout. Radical transformation. Super radical!

Surprising discovery

Locked up in America

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Come back soon!

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Goop sets its sights on men’s wellness

Goop sets its sights on men’s wellness

Read more on Glossy

From Our Members

  • This fake-healthcare trend is just awful. Goop is nothing but a giant scam, conning the gullible into wasting money on healing crystals and super-herbs and other such crap.

  • I was unaware that Goop is a household name (as this article claims). I was pretty certain this brand was primarily for the elite, entitled, and extremely privileged class. I’m curious to hear this new podcast and explore what they offer for men’s wellness. Ideally it is helpful for more than just the

    I was unaware that Goop is a household name (as this article claims). I was pretty certain this brand was primarily for the elite, entitled, and extremely privileged class. I’m curious to hear this new podcast and explore what they offer for men’s wellness. Ideally it is helpful for more than just the bourgeoisie. I recognize this is coming off rather bitter sounding, the real goal is to be frank and examine Goop and this move in an unbiased way. Not sure that goal was reached...

    Sincerely though, you have to have great means to live the lifestyle that Goop is selling. With income inequality exploding in the US of A, this means an ever dwindling share of the population can afford it. Currently 80% (8 out of every 10 people) of US Americans are living paycheck to paycheck. I guess the good news for Goop though is that the rich are getting richer and so they can spend egregious amounts of money on their wellness if they’d like. The rest of us will just have to remember to drink plenty of water, get a good nights sleep, walk and exercise regularly, minimize eating processed and deep fried foodstuffs and try and eat as many whole foods as possible.