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Alessandro Cripsta

Good evening.

Up, up, and away

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

Saving WeWork

WeWork is getting a lifeline. SoftBank Group and JP Morgan both have plans to bail out the struggling office-sharing company, CNBC reports. WeWork's board will review the proposals by the end of the week and opt for one or a combination.

SoftBank, JP Morgan to submit separate WeWork bailout proposals in coming days

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors are surprised that they can’t get enough customers in the door to keep the lights on.

What I never hear discussed in these talk about wavering SV companies is whether customers are buying their product. Have you looked at the price of a spot in a WeWork office? It’s astronomical for someone starting a small business and apparently the current price point isn’t even enough to cover the costs of goods (I.e. office space) much less turn a profit. Golden toilets.

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given WeWork close to $11 billion, the company might be beyond rescue. Hard to say whether SoftBank's throwing good money after bad. Right now, all WeWork has going for it is the company's existing contracts & what's left of its brand. The next month will be intriguing to watch.

Quartz at work

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

US-China tech diplomacy

Apple users in China: Beware. Privacy advocates worry about the US tech giant’s partnership with Tencent, which has close ties to Beijing, as they think it could share the IP addresses of internet users who try to visit blacklisted sites.

Apple’s data sharing with firms tied to the Chinese government may endanger dissidents

Have you visited a fraudulent site? If so, you likely got a warning from Google. But in China, users get warnings from Tencent, a co. close to the Chinese government. Thus, a service meant to protect users could threaten their freedom. Staying safe (and private) is hard.

The World in 50 Years

Apple's Indian revival

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Locked up in America

Stop the presses

Surprising discovery

Come back soon!

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Nike’s Latest Sneakers Are Only Available in Fortnite

Nike’s Latest Sneakers Are Only Available in Fortnite

Read more on Bloomberg

From Our Members

  • This is very cool indeed and shows how gaming aka "worldest largest niche community" is crossing more and more into the mainstream spotlight. This comes off the heels of Avengers to Marshmello—who had a live digital concert event in Fortnite all over the world that had 10M+ concurrent viewers/gamers

    This is very cool indeed and shows how gaming aka "worldest largest niche community" is crossing more and more into the mainstream spotlight. This comes off the heels of Avengers to Marshmello—who had a live digital concert event in Fortnite all over the world that had 10M+ concurrent viewers/gamers listening to him perform (digitally) from Fortnite's Pleasant Park (a point of interest in the game). He gained a lot of new fans who haven't heard of his music let alone his name before.

    The Fortnite x Jordan is an event and challenge within the game too, where players can do the event to win the prize. It's very interactive and fun, and having the coolest skins or kicks in this case kind of matters socially.

    Because there's social side effects. Kids that can't afford or get via events/challenges new skins and cool stuff like this, can sometimes feel left out. Kids who are using Fortnite's default skins are made fun of and called "default players" (which is digital bullying). So not having any skins can be seen as uncool and makes you apparently somewhat "lesser" of a player when skins are purely cosmetic and don't give you an in-game advantage.

    It's the digital world, yes you can wear nice clothes in real life but do you have the latest and coolest Fortnite skins?! Skins, especially limited edition ones, for other games like Honor of Kings, can go as high as $200. That's social proof, that's showing off beautiful hero/character skins that are more limited and rare than skins others have.

    It's getting very interesting as the online world merges further with offline but more importantly, how purely digital online things you own are impacting offline life. To young Gen Z'ers there's no such thing as 2 different worlds since Millennials were the last generation to grew up during the age of the internet so I'm aware of the divide between digital and real but younger generations—there is no difference and what you own in the digital world can have as much, if not more of an impact on your social status than you may think.

  • Fortnite lets footwear brand reach 250 million consumers. Amazing. Fortnite and other digital platforms where young people interact should get much more media coverage than they do now. We somehow still think "the kids" are hanging out on Facebook while the most edgy know about Instagram and Snapchat

    Fortnite lets footwear brand reach 250 million consumers. Amazing. Fortnite and other digital platforms where young people interact should get much more media coverage than they do now. We somehow still think "the kids" are hanging out on Facebook while the most edgy know about Instagram and Snapchat. But the reality is a little bit different.

  • You can get the latest exclusive Air Jordans only for $20 bucks.

    The thing is that you will not be able to physically touch them, as they'll only exist in Fortnite videogame's digital world.

    #digitalassets #marketing #airjordans

  • Brilliant crossover partnership - well done by both sides. NKE broadens its reach and further entrenches itself with young consumers. Fortnite teams up with an iconic global brand that only grows their brand further. I suspect we will see more partnerships akin to this one in the months and years ahead.

  • $15 for digital shoes today, and then how many thousands for digital Fenty shades on my lifelike Oculus avatar in 2025?

  • Great example of how Nike is evolving its social media presence to capitalize of new generation of "athletes"

  • In game promotions and in game transactions have been a major revenue source for many of the game platforms. The crossover is actually very interesting because not only does it serve as a monetization strategy for both Nike and Epic Games, but it also is a phenomenal branding and marketing solution for

    In game promotions and in game transactions have been a major revenue source for many of the game platforms. The crossover is actually very interesting because not only does it serve as a monetization strategy for both Nike and Epic Games, but it also is a phenomenal branding and marketing solution for Nike in the physical world for pre-launch of any product.