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CEO corner

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

Money, money, money

Live from the International Astronautical Congress

The business of travel

Marking 30 years of the web

The latest on Brexit

WeWork gets worse

SoftBank takes over WeWork. The board of the shared office company chose the Japanese conglomerate over a competing offer from JP Morgan, the Wall Street Journal reports. Co-founder Adam Neumann will lose control of WeWork—but get a $1.7 billion payout.

SoftBank to Boost Stake in WeWork in Deal That Cuts Most Ties With Neumann

Being a big fan of WeWork’s service, it is sad to see the devaluation hitting this level. Moreover, the payout to Adam N is beyond silly for a company that is going to need a major structural face lift.

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed to unrealistic valuations.

And now SoftBank will have to live with the creature it helped create...

India's coal addiction

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet. Quartz explores how India is meeting the challenge of providing increasing amounts of energy to its people while trying to lower its dependence on fossil fuels. ✦

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular, has other motivations: from energy security to soft power.

Making immigration work

Time to get lost in a museum...

New York's MoMA has reopened and it's a whole new experience. After the 90-year old institution’s $450-million expansion, it’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing.

It’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing

MoMA used to be my favorite museum in New York and now it's my favorite by a long shot. Aside from a few placings that feel designed for content creation (👀 surrealist section), this expansion is forward-thinking and inspired.

... and come back soon

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The Impossible Future of Christians in the Middle East

The Impossible Future of Christians in the Middle East

Read more on The Atlantic

From Our Members

  • “The precarious state of Christianity in Iraq is tragic on its own terms. The world may soon witness the permanent displacement of an ancient religion, and an ancient people. Those indigenous to this area share more than faith: They call themselves Suraye and claim a connection to the ancient peoples

    “The precarious state of Christianity in Iraq is tragic on its own terms. The world may soon witness the permanent displacement of an ancient religion, and an ancient people. Those indigenous to this area share more than faith: They call themselves Suraye and claim a connection to the ancient peoples who inhabited this land long before the birth of Christ.

    But the fate of Christianity in places like the Nineveh Plain has a geopolitical significance as well. Religious minorities test a country’s tolerance for pluralism; a healthy liberal democracy protects vulnerable groups and allows them to participate freely in society. Whether Christians can survive, and thrive, in Muslim-majority countries is a crucial indicator of whether democracy, too, is viable in those places. In Iraq, the outlook is grim, as it is in other nations in the region that are home to historic Christian populations, including Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. Christians who live in these places are subject to discrimination, government-sanctioned intimidation, and routine violence.”

  • A very sad state of affairs. But spot the trend: of the four countries mentioned, Iraq and Syria have been decimated by illegal wars of the West, Egypt is headed by a dictator who has the backing of the West and Turkey is governed by a reformer-turned-dictator who gathers national support in large part

    A very sad state of affairs. But spot the trend: of the four countries mentioned, Iraq and Syria have been decimated by illegal wars of the West, Egypt is headed by a dictator who has the backing of the West and Turkey is governed by a reformer-turned-dictator who gathers national support in large part by fuelling anger against the West's actions in the region. It's convenient to point fingers are at those countries when the reality is the West has to take its share of responsibility in the region's problems. Stop bombing countries, maybe?