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Google and Facebook are gonna hate Apple's new privacy-preserving online ads

Google and Facebook are gonna hate Apple's new privacy-preserving online ads

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  • Apple is raising the bar on privacy with a new service that tracks effectiveness of ads while preserving consumer privacy. It is clever and potentially a big challenge to FB and Google.

  • Apple: We will go to great lengths to stop third parties from collecting our users' private information.

    Also Apple: We will go to great lengths to collect and monetize our users' private information to improve our bottom line.

  • Apple says the proposed solution will allow advertisers to measure the effectiveness of their ad campaigns on the web without compromising on your privacy.

    This effectively means an advertiser can know that you bought an item by clicking an ad — called ad conversion — but won’t posses any identifiable information about you.

  • This will provide greater privacy through obfuscation of user data. A smart move from Apple who relies less on ad revenue than Facebook and Google.

    #apple #privacy

  • Interesting. This sounds like it could be a fairly significant step toward a less-intrusive internet ad economy. The tech uses your browser as a middleman between the website where you saw an ad and the website which placed the ad. Currently, if you click an ad, it sends all the data it can to both the

    Interesting. This sounds like it could be a fairly significant step toward a less-intrusive internet ad economy. The tech uses your browser as a middleman between the website where you saw an ad and the website which placed the ad. Currently, if you click an ad, it sends all the data it can to both the ad’s owner and its host. With this, your browser strips out all the personal identification data and waits 24-48 hours before sending the only the basic info needed to gauge if an ad campaign is working. Your unique personal data remains solely on your own computer.

    Instead of the involved companies seeing that “John Doe clicked an ad on Site A at 11:32 AM on Sunday 5/25/19 and then purchased the relevant item on Site B a few minutes later”, Site A would just see that “a user clicked an ad for Site B and made a purchase”, Site B would just see that “a customer made a purchase after clicking an ad on Site A”, and the ad host would just see that “Site B’s ad on Site A led to a purchase.” This way, all the relevant companies can still measure the effectiveness of an ad, but buying something through an ad won’t result in those companies gaining access to your identity or your purchasing or browsing history.

    It’s plainly obvious by now that the justification of “showing better/more relevant ads” is complete junk. Customers would rather see ads based on what site they’re on, like seeing ads based on what magazine they’re reading or what show they’re watching. Giving up troves of personal info for companies to exploit and sell in exchange for “relevant” ads is not a fair trade.

    Assuming it works as advertised, this should push online advertising toward a less intrusive and more sustainable model. Apple is making a very smart move here by betting that, by taking concrete steps to improve user privacy while its biggest competitors engage heavily in surveillance and info-brokering, it can improve and retain customer goodwill in the long run. They also would be getting out ahead of any upcoming privacy legislation, potentially giving them a nice leg up on the competition if and when the law cracks down on corporate surveillance.

  • How long until safari users start seeing the "for best results in this website please switch to chrome" banner...

  • Apple’s planned solution for Safari won’t block ads and allow advertisers to attribute clicks — but won’t pass on identifiable information about users

  • When I will track you “less” is a winning argument...

  • Apple has had a longer history and much greater credibility and reputation and protecting the privacy of its consumers. For the past 5 years, Apple has been battling district courts that have been demanding Apple to extract content, data and photos from iPhones.

  • I will have to check WWDC 2019 which is going to hold June 4.

    I guess that Apple will disclose detail of new privacy policy.