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Robot umpires are coming to baseball

Robot umpires are coming to baseball

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  • The commissioner of baseball is not a fan. The most conspicuous example is his determination to force the DH onto the National League. Next thing you know, he will insist on identical field dimensions ... and robot umpires.

    Baseball’s future is uncertain. The pace of the game and length of the season

    The commissioner of baseball is not a fan. The most conspicuous example is his determination to force the DH onto the National League. Next thing you know, he will insist on identical field dimensions ... and robot umpires.

    Baseball’s future is uncertain. The pace of the game and length of the season are totally out of step with the short attention spans of young people. The focus on metrics is making the game less fun for die hards. Fantasy sports and esports are distracting the younger fan base.

  • I'd love to read Roger McNamee's take on this.

    And here it is:

    "The commissioner of baseball is not a fan. The most conspicuous example is his determination to force the DH onto the National League. Next thing you know, he will insist on identical field dimensions ... and robot umpires."

    "Baseball’s

    I'd love to read Roger McNamee's take on this.

    And here it is:

    "The commissioner of baseball is not a fan. The most conspicuous example is his determination to force the DH onto the National League. Next thing you know, he will insist on identical field dimensions ... and robot umpires."

    "Baseball’s future is uncertain. The pace of the game and length of the season are totally out of step with the short attention spans of young people. The focus on metrics is making the game less fun for die hards. Fantasy sports and esports are distracting the younger fan base."

  • The idea of TrackMan being implemented in MLB games faces many problems, and these are a few:

    1.) The umpires union will have a fit, and rightly so. With the union likely fighting its implementation tooth and nail. MLB will have to sweeten the pot considerably for this to ever pass.

    2.) It’s unclear

    The idea of TrackMan being implemented in MLB games faces many problems, and these are a few:

    1.) The umpires union will have a fit, and rightly so. With the union likely fighting its implementation tooth and nail. MLB will have to sweeten the pot considerably for this to ever pass.

    2.) It’s unclear how the players union will feel about this possibility. Converting umpires, especially the home plate umpire, will radically alter cherished dynamics of the game.

    3.) Until now, instant replay has served only as a safety net used for closely contested calls. Never at any time has an artificial intelligence made real-time decisions during the game at play.

    4.) TrackMan opens up issues never wrangled with before. Such as in game technical malfunctions, some of which may be problems not identified until the game is over. How do you explain that to the losing team in Game 7 of the World Series?

    5.) In all likelihood, using this technology will force the players union and owners to revisit the rules during collect bargaining. Most importantly to clearly establish a uniform MLB strike zone for the unwavering programming of TrackMan.

    The strike zone outlined in the official rulebook is almost never enforced in reality. The realistic zone is from the batters back knee, to just under their belt. If TrackMan starts calling strikes knees to letters, players/managers will have in game aneurysms.

    6.) Baseball fans historically are very protective of changing fundamental elements of the game, unlike, say, in the NFL. Most everything to this point has not fundamentally changed baseball itself. TrackMan most definitely will.

    The Independent League is well noted for pushing the boundaries of the game, likely to promote interest and public attention. Though it’s a long road from there to The Show for something like TrackMan.

  • That takes all the fun out of it.

  • Technology and automation have a role in many aspects of sports, especially in the production of sports gear, or the management of the supply chain, verification and traceability of memorabilia and apparel in general, but to make it part of the game takes away from the culture. Not everything needs to

    Technology and automation have a role in many aspects of sports, especially in the production of sports gear, or the management of the supply chain, verification and traceability of memorabilia and apparel in general, but to make it part of the game takes away from the culture. Not everything needs to be automated or integrated with artificial intelligence, otherwise art and dance or opera can all be replaced as well (not that it is not already encroaching).

  • If TrackMan had been around back in the day, mighty Casey, (of the Mudville nine), may well

    have not struck out....where’s technology when you need it....

  • Horrible idea. Baseball today is already suffering, and not because of anything inherently wrong with the sport, simply because of bad management decisions by the league. This would be doubling down on all those mistakes.

    Sensors and AI and the like should only be used in sports if a play is too close

    Horrible idea. Baseball today is already suffering, and not because of anything inherently wrong with the sport, simply because of bad management decisions by the league. This would be doubling down on all those mistakes.

    Sensors and AI and the like should only be used in sports if a play is too close to call, or if a call is contested. The fact that referees/umpires are human— and thus both fallible and capable of judgment calls in unique situations— is a critical, core part of sports. Infringing on that human element just makes the sport, any sport, less interesting.