Skip to navigationSkip to content
Alessandro Cripsta

Good afternoon.

Reflecting on Volcker's rule

The New Purpose of Companies

Beyond the fintech hype

Deep-pocketed investors are pouring money into fintech companies, but which are for real and which will fade? Quartz's latest field guide surveys ten unicorns to explain what's changing in financial services, and what's just driven by fear of missing out. ✦

Beyond the fintech hype

Is there a fintech bubble? Our guide uncovered a distinct fear of missing out among investors—venture capital funds are shoveling cash into money losing startups, and even more money into the few that are profitable.

A few themes emerge from the haze of hype: many of the most valuable fintech startups

Is there a fintech bubble? Our guide uncovered a distinct fear of missing out among investors—venture capital funds are shoveling cash into money losing startups, and even more money into the few that are profitable.

A few themes emerge from the haze of hype: many of the most valuable fintech startups are in emerging markets, as investors hope to make bundle by extending financial services to people who have traditionally lacked them.

Another theme is that many of these companies have unremarkable business models. Among them are banks, brokers, and payment companies. They seem more like finance companies that tech companies. If that's right, they should be valued accordingly.

This paragraph stands out: "Perhaps the most surprising thing about the most highly valued fintechs is how ordinary some of them are. They usually rely on software that’s hosted in the cloud, and their apps have whizzy interfaces. Otherwise, many of them act a lot like regular financial companies. They

This paragraph stands out: "Perhaps the most surprising thing about the most highly valued fintechs is how ordinary some of them are. They usually rely on software that’s hosted in the cloud, and their apps have whizzy interfaces. Otherwise, many of them act a lot like regular financial companies. They process payments, take deposits, make loans, and, in one case, provide brokerage for stock and options trading."

Quartz at work

The gig is up

The nature of cities

Impeachment today

Big Tech discovers Africa

Global freedom of expression

Rohingya get a day in court

Making space for women

Most cities aren't built for women cyclists. Women are much less likely to commute to work by bike than men, and many cite safety as their main concern. By building out bike infrastructure, cities like Copenhagen have reached cycling gender parity—and made the roads safer for everyone.

Women love bikes—so why don’t they cycle to work?

As a woman cycling to work in suits on the regular I was pretty pissed about this headline, which like so many stories about gender apparently reflects a truth but sounds like more of the same old dated tale about women being exceptionally delicate creatures. Anyhow, it's true that it's more fun to bike

As a woman cycling to work in suits on the regular I was pretty pissed about this headline, which like so many stories about gender apparently reflects a truth but sounds like more of the same old dated tale about women being exceptionally delicate creatures. Anyhow, it's true that it's more fun to bike where it's safe but I doubt very much that men don't also appreciate bike lanes. Unfortunate approach to this story that sells short all cyclists, and especially women.

In the world of transit advocacy there is a useful rubric called the 8-80 rule, which encourages us to think about designing cities in such a way that both an 8 year-old and an 80 year-old can comfortably and safely get around. Instead, most cities prioritize cars and leave everyone else - cyclists and

In the world of transit advocacy there is a useful rubric called the 8-80 rule, which encourages us to think about designing cities in such a way that both an 8 year-old and an 80 year-old can comfortably and safely get around. Instead, most cities prioritize cars and leave everyone else - cyclists and pedestrians alike - to fend for themselves. This has led to a survival of the fittest view of urban life that is wildly discriminatory and outdated.

Thankfully, urban cycling benefits from a well-documented safety-in-numbers effect. By choosing to ride a bike you're not only benefitting yourself, you're also making your city a safer place for everybody to enjoy.

This validated and confirmed so many of the internal and external questions I have had to face as a bike owner (and aspiring cyclist) in NYC, more often than not my bike stays home for all the reasons that were broken down

"That was totally worth it"

Close
How did killing journalists become a game? Sniper 3D CTO explains

How did killing journalists become a game? Sniper 3D CTO explains

Read more on National Press Club

Contributions

  • After pulling the killing of a journalist segment out of its game (some fixes still working to make this change) some players were upset...

    "I came for the journalist level. Disappointed!” said another one-star review posted after the mission was pulled from the Apple version.

    Really? You came to the

    After pulling the killing of a journalist segment out of its game (some fixes still working to make this change) some players were upset...

    "I came for the journalist level. Disappointed!” said another one-star review posted after the mission was pulled from the Apple version.

    Really? You came to the game to have the chance to kill a journalist and now that its been pulled you're disappointed?

    This is exactly why were outraged that this was included in the game to begin with.

  • Video game developers remove scenario encouraging players to kill journalists. But some online versions of “Sniper 3D Assassin,” that celebrates murdering what U.S. President Trump calls the “enemy of the state,” still available, says the @PressClubDC.

  • Although journalists are non-combatants, and therefore there is definitely an issue to be concerned about, the comments in the article are just as ludacris. Of course we should not condone risks to journalists, nor should this become a norm or acceptable. But are the implications of the comments are

    Although journalists are non-combatants, and therefore there is definitely an issue to be concerned about, the comments in the article are just as ludacris. Of course we should not condone risks to journalists, nor should this become a norm or acceptable. But are the implications of the comments are that violence and the normalcy of risk and violence to other people is acceptable?

  • Not sure how many will agree with me, but as someone who grew up playing. Grand Theft Auto 3, this doesn't seem like that big of a deal to me. Sure, it's a nasty bit of a game, but journalists need to be careful about chipping away at the First Amendment over something as trivial . as this.