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Lorenzo Gritti

Good morning.

Changing the game for health

Monopolizing deportation

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

The myth of work perfection

The perfect morning routine doesn’t exist. The “optimized” morning peddled by celebrities, tech gurus, and influencers isn’t realistic for everyone, the Atlantic reports. And trying to achieve one could impact your mental health.

The False Promise of Morning Routines

The exhaustive analysis we've been doing on the morning routines of famous people has gotten so out of control, we've basically been copying what tech execs are doing with biohacking.

We all have different styles, and Marina nails what we need to do at the end:

"I would be better off embracing my scattered

The exhaustive analysis we've been doing on the morning routines of famous people has gotten so out of control, we've basically been copying what tech execs are doing with biohacking.

We all have different styles, and Marina nails what we need to do at the end:

"I would be better off embracing my scattered mornings and pinpointing the bits and pieces I could simplify, rather than mimicking someone else’s morning routine, no matter how nice it looks from the outside."

A solid "morning routine" for a person is dedicated to create presence, calm, and focus so we can tackle the crazy days ahead of us. We can observe others, but we need to learn and adapt, not straight-up copy.

It's the most wonderful time of the year?

Phones aren't always our friends

The impeachment report report

The way we age now

New planet, same problems

Disrupting dementia

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem. No matter how far science advances, it will never be able to tell you how to personally deal with a dementia diagnosis. ✦

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and choked up talking to my friend, and a stranger. It was an eye opening experience, and I'm grateful they shared their stories.

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality of patients and their families, and the surgical/cold eye of scientists and healthcare practitioners on these devastating diseases.

Bitcoin crime doesn't pay

The US jobs report is coming

Our crystal ball says you'll be back

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As Mexico cracks down on migrants, more risk the dangerous train known as La Bestia

As Mexico cracks down on migrants, more risk the dangerous train known as La Bestia

Read more on latimes.com

Contributions

  • This train has meant trouble for quite some years now, and the passengers would stay on it or in any of the stops across the country.

    The kind of stories you can find on those towns where Central American immigrants stood, are just incredible but also makes you think about the facts you were told.

  • Can't read the article without subscribing dammit

  • Bringing children and braving the dangers of suffocation or being thrown from the top of moving train box cars is definitely a demonstration of the desperation but also shows the judgement of the migrants. Not trying to be insensitive as a child of immigrants, but the irresponsible actions of the parents

    Bringing children and braving the dangers of suffocation or being thrown from the top of moving train box cars is definitely a demonstration of the desperation but also shows the judgement of the migrants. Not trying to be insensitive as a child of immigrants, but the irresponsible actions of the parents do not help the cause in the long term.

  • The

  • The article is a people story that gives the reader the current media immigration narrative of oppressed huddled masses yearning to breathe free. The writer of the article is remarkably un-curios about where these trains come from. Who schedules the train to show up on a semi-regular basis and haul immigrants

    The article is a people story that gives the reader the current media immigration narrative of oppressed huddled masses yearning to breathe free. The writer of the article is remarkably un-curios about where these trains come from. Who schedules the train to show up on a semi-regular basis and haul immigrants north with absolutely no regard for their safety? What’s the name of the railroad? Why is the Mexican government permitting this to happen? Are the criminal cartels involved? Beyond being a destination, is there an American role in this mess? The LA Times editor in charge needs to start demanding answers because this Pulitzer Prize finalist looks like your basic contemporary American journalist - a poorly over educated upper middle class white guy. So let’s have the LA Times go back down there and get a real story for a change . . . and this time, skip the huddled masses stuff.