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CRISPR Baby Mutation Linked to Higher Risk of Early Death

CRISPR Baby Mutation Linked to Higher Risk of Early Death

Read more on Gizmodo

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  • This is making quite some buzz right now in the scientific community: « People with two copies of a mutation that protects against the HIV virus, known as CCR5-delta 32, are more likely to die before age 76 than individuals without the mutation »

    Edit: Some experts have done some analysis of the original

    This is making quite some buzz right now in the scientific community: « People with two copies of a mutation that protects against the HIV virus, known as CCR5-delta 32, are more likely to die before age 76 than individuals without the mutation »

    Edit: Some experts have done some analysis of the original paper, which seem to be very confusing.

  • Not *quite* as bad as the headline sounds, but still very indicative of how reckless and rushed the so-called “CRISPR baby” project was. Even uncontroversial concepts like HIV immunity are vastly complex, and have far too many unknowns for human experimentation to be ethical.

    “Previous studies have

    Not *quite* as bad as the headline sounds, but still very indicative of how reckless and rushed the so-called “CRISPR baby” project was. Even uncontroversial concepts like HIV immunity are vastly complex, and have far too many unknowns for human experimentation to be ethical.

    “Previous studies have shown that the [rare but naturally-appearing] mutation, while conferring resistance to the HIV virus, appears to put people at greater risk from other infectious diseases. The mutation, for example, makes people four times more likely to die from the flu....

    ‘Beyond the many ethical issues involved with the CRISPR babies, the fact is that, right now, with current knowledge, it is still very dangerous to try to introduce mutations without knowing the full effect of what those mutations do,’ said Nielsen. ‘In this case, it is probably not a mutation that most people would want to have. You are actually, on average, worse off having it.’..

    The new study is yet another reminder that human gene editing will be exceptionally tricky work.... Human gene-editing is in our future, with future being the key word.”