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A Brief History of How Your Privacy Was Stolen

A Brief History of How Your Privacy Was Stolen

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Featured contributions

  • The New York Times published an opinion piece that I wrote for its Privacy Project.

    I urge everyone to study the work of Shoshana Zuboff, especially The Age of Surveillance Capitalism. Google and Facebook have moved from trading free services for data to gathering all available data to create digital

    The New York Times published an opinion piece that I wrote for its Privacy Project.

    I urge everyone to study the work of Shoshana Zuboff, especially The Age of Surveillance Capitalism. Google and Facebook have moved from trading free services for data to gathering all available data to create digital voodoo dolls of every consumer, which they use to manipulate behavior. Consumers get no benefits from the data voodoo dolls or the manipulation.

    It does not have to be this way. Apple is creating a path for its customers. Antitrust action can create space for startups with new business models.

More contributions

  • Roger McNamee's contribution to The New York Times #Privacy series. It's an absolute must read.

    "Credit goes to Shoshana Zuboff for defining the problem and helping me see it," he commented on Twitter.

    "I urge everyone to study the work of Shoshana Zuboff, especially The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

    Roger McNamee's contribution to The New York Times #Privacy series. It's an absolute must read.

    "Credit goes to Shoshana Zuboff for defining the problem and helping me see it," he commented on Twitter.

    "I urge everyone to study the work of Shoshana Zuboff, especially The Age of Surveillance Capitalism. Google and Facebook have moved from trading free services for data to gathering all available data to create digital voodoo dolls of every consumer, which they use to manipulate behavior. Consumers get no benefits from the data voodoo dolls or the manipulation.

    It does not have to be this way. Apple is creating a path for its customers. Antitrust action can create space for startups with new business models," he further commented on the QZ News App.

  • Must-read.

    “Why it is legal for service providers to comb our messages and documents for economically valuable data? Why is it legal for third parties to trade in our most private information, including credit card transactions, location and health data, and browsing history? Why is it legal to gather

    Must-read.

    “Why it is legal for service providers to comb our messages and documents for economically valuable data? Why is it legal for third parties to trade in our most private information, including credit card transactions, location and health data, and browsing history? Why is it legal to gather any data at all about minors? Why is it legal to trade predictions of our behavior?

    Corporate claims to our data are not legitimate and we must fight back.

    To my friends in the tech industry: Please explain why we should allow the status quo to continue, given the increasing evidence of harm.

    To my friends in government: The time has come to ban third-party exploitation of consumer data and to use antitrust law to promote competing business models. This is not a matter of right or left; it is a matter of right and wrong.”

  • Pardon my skepticism but Mr. Mcnamee made his money off these companies and strikes me as particularly astute. So I have to wonder whether his warnings about privacy are truly altruistic in nature or if he has ulterior self-serving motives. If you read some of his interviews, all these bad things started

    Pardon my skepticism but Mr. Mcnamee made his money off these companies and strikes me as particularly astute. So I have to wonder whether his warnings about privacy are truly altruistic in nature or if he has ulterior self-serving motives. If you read some of his interviews, all these bad things started happening about a month after he retired and cut his formal business relationships with Facebook. His concerns started mounting when the Bernie Sanders campaign managed to target Hillary Clinton via Facebook- and came to a head just before Trump was elected.

    He feels that Facebook can manipulate weak willed voters - to vote against his perceived best interests. Would he have been as vocal if the results had gone the other way? How about what Facebook was doing during the elections that President Obama ran in - and when Mr. Mcnamee was directly advising FB?

    So, I am skeptical. My real issue is that he sees the general public as people who can be manipulated like Voodoo dolls. He, of course, is above that, and cannot be manipulated.

    What does he think he's doing writing an Op-ed? Manipulating us poor saps?

    The scenario he paints about insurance companies is real, however, and that is what should really concern us if that information is used against us. On the other hand, if FB actually could diagnose Parkinson's, that dance information could be used to aid the person.

    There argument about fake news and weak willed voters is one that I place little stock in; that game has been going on since newspapers were first published. It's nothing new and the only people who squawk are folks from political parties of every persuasion that have lost elections.

    We need someone else to guide us into the future.

  • “This is not a matter of right or left; it is a matter of right and wrong.” Absolutely agree it's a matter of right and wrong but disagree that right or left is irrelevant.

    Doing something about user privacy involves shifting the power away from Big Tech. How or where does that power get redistributed

    “This is not a matter of right or left; it is a matter of right and wrong.” Absolutely agree it's a matter of right and wrong but disagree that right or left is irrelevant.

    Doing something about user privacy involves shifting the power away from Big Tech. How or where does that power get redistributed to? The right will advocate for putting the power in the free market (via antitrust etc), the left want the power in the hands of the people (break up Big Tech and make them accountable to democratically elected officials).

    Since the data that surveillance capitalism exploits is our (the people's) data, I think there's a strong impressive for us to have a say in how it is used.

    Surveillance capitalism is wrong and to ensure that people's privacy are protected we need people involved. In other words, we need leftwing policies.

  • “We need to reclaim our privacy, our freedom to make choices without fear. Our data is out there, but we have the political power to prevent inappropriate uses.”

  • I can't wait to join in on the impending class action lawsuits.