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“Flying-V” airplane design promises fuel savings, but there’s a catch

“Flying-V” airplane design promises fuel savings, but there’s a catch

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Featured contributions

  • If there were just a few the routes would be sold out and it would be a premium service. Not a bad way to test out the concept. I'm curious just how steep the angle would be with that turn many planes make right after take off or when circling for landing. Depending on how much meal and drink service

    If there were just a few the routes would be sold out and it would be a premium service. Not a bad way to test out the concept. I'm curious just how steep the angle would be with that turn many planes make right after take off or when circling for landing. Depending on how much meal and drink service would have to be when the plane isn't turning. Also, what about turbulence? So many questions to find out just how big the downside really is.

More contributions

  • This a great story about innovation, and how design makes you think about trade offs in performance. There are very few “perfect” designs, almost every product is a series of informed compromises.

  • Where's the washrooms with that much movement while banking it would seem to be an uncomfortable ride and getting out of the seats dangerous. For some it would be long and nauseating.

  • Always nice to see people thinking outside the box when it comes to lowering carbon emissions.

  • Nothing wrong with a Little Rock and Roll as you soar

  • Kudos to folks who are trying this out - and especially to TU Delft and its dean (Henri Werij) and faculty (Peter Vink) of aerospace engineering. I think of it as a concept that everyone can learn from. They know the downside (and we hope the pilot won't forget about limiting banking during the celebration

    Kudos to folks who are trying this out - and especially to TU Delft and its dean (Henri Werij) and faculty (Peter Vink) of aerospace engineering. I think of it as a concept that everyone can learn from. They know the downside (and we hope the pilot won't forget about limiting banking during the celebration) and they'll definitely get more data from real flights.

    Kudos to collaborative work between universities and their communities!

    Go

  • Does this really matter given that the world is awash in oil? Crude <&50 for a sustained time seems to be the base case. Which reminds me how ridiculous “peak oil” in 2007 now seems...

  • Interesting. Maybe make it available for shorter routes? Cheaper tickets? Roller coaster ride?

  • Interesting looking aircraft. Not so much "out of the box" thinking as "out of the tube". Like a quesadilla over a burrito.

    The tooling, I would think, would only be an issue for the first run of production. As this design becomes more universal the costs will go down, and tooling for capital invedtments

    Interesting looking aircraft. Not so much "out of the box" thinking as "out of the tube". Like a quesadilla over a burrito.

    The tooling, I would think, would only be an issue for the first run of production. As this design becomes more universal the costs will go down, and tooling for capital invedtments, like aircraft, have a very long lifespan. Remember, when Boeing made the first 747s, there was no commonality in the structure with anything else.

    Kudos for KLM for pushing for a responsible and sustainable change.

    Granted, the flying style and maneuvers may have to be altered to keep passengers from making a mess with spilled food, drinks and lost lunches. But that's a small price for this type of progress.

  • Depending on where the washroom is located, it may be easier for us men to do a sit down pee than try to stand while this thing is banking. Wold make for a very messy washroom.

  • Not suggesting KLM has not done so, but it is not apparent from the reporting here if enough strategic thinking was involved. One of the biggest challenges for the next generation of innovation is to think beyond traditional system development life cycles and look broader and deeper. Traditionally there

    Not suggesting KLM has not done so, but it is not apparent from the reporting here if enough strategic thinking was involved. One of the biggest challenges for the next generation of innovation is to think beyond traditional system development life cycles and look broader and deeper. Traditionally there were five phases then seven, but more than looking at requirements and analytics, designs today need to think through costs for implementation and integration of new solutions, bearing in mind the decision of how disruptive it will be and the total costs. Not only for development and implementation in isolation but also for deployment and maintenance across the entire value chain. Creating a paradigm shift or discontinuous innovations is always necessary but the total cost and penalty on environment and society needs to be calculated. Achieving the benefits of energy efficiency in flight needs to be taken in consideration of all of the additional costs including reclamation, refitting or obsoleting the status quo. We are already awash in technologies that offer near term tactical benefits but create massive longer term issues and penalties.

  • Fill those wings with gyroscopic sleep pods

  • Cool design, but could you imagine being at the end of one of those “wing seats” when the aircraft banks for a landing? Oy, hold onto your drinks!

  • Looks good to me!

    Who is building dead bird!

  • Looks like Gibson Flying V!

  • Awesome

  • Tomorrow?