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Baltimore ransomware attack will cost the city over $18 million

Baltimore ransomware attack will cost the city over $18 million

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  • Gah - so painful to read. Especially given that I'm sure that $18m is desperately needed somewhere else.

    Securing those connected systems, not just the PCs but the IOT end points (parking meters etc) are super critical, they cost money, but the cost of being un-protected is self-evident. And, as some

    Gah - so painful to read. Especially given that I'm sure that $18m is desperately needed somewhere else.

    Securing those connected systems, not just the PCs but the IOT end points (parking meters etc) are super critical, they cost money, but the cost of being un-protected is self-evident. And, as some have commented, it could have been a lot worse.

    Microsoft is on a panel about security next week at NXP Connects in San Jose, I'm sure this incident will be a topic of discussion.

    #microsoft #cybersecurity #IoT

  • While not forgiving this attack in the least nor lessening it's impact or severity, it is really important to note that this was relatively low impact to what was possible. It is also important for policy makers to wake up to the reality of how vulnerable systems are and how little policy makers understand

    While not forgiving this attack in the least nor lessening it's impact or severity, it is really important to note that this was relatively low impact to what was possible. It is also important for policy makers to wake up to the reality of how vulnerable systems are and how little policy makers understand technologies they are making decisions about. Public infrastructure, from water works to hospitals to the energy grids etc are not just vulnerable to ransom for their Data being encrypted and unaccessible but also for operations and worse. If a hacker is able to ransom the data they are also able to control operational aspects like turning off water or stealing the data and analyzing it for malicious intentions. If data is really the next oil then we need to have far better security and trust solutions to protect the data and manage the custody of the data itself.

  • I don't understand why this story isn't getting more buzz. It's bananas that a major US city would be shut down like this, and IT'S STILL HAPPENING: "The city's water billing systems are offline so residents may face larger than usual water bills, and parking or speeding fines can only be paid using

    I don't understand why this story isn't getting more buzz. It's bananas that a major US city would be shut down like this, and IT'S STILL HAPPENING: "The city's water billing systems are offline so residents may face larger than usual water bills, and parking or speeding fines can only be paid using paper tickets instead of electronic methods."

  • The US rather urgently needs to update technology infrastructure & security.

  • The malware used to initiate these attacks was created by and stolen from the federal government. As a consequence, the cost of the damages experienced by Baltimore and other attacked municipalities should be born by the federal government.

  • Akin to our infrastructure investment challenges for physical items (roads, bridges, water systems, etc), our aging technologies in vulnerable points are in need also.

    Making such investments are catalysts to security and economic health, but hard to get buy in for, alas.

  • The Daily episode about this is worth a listen.

  • They got Atlanta last year