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Barnes & Noble to Be Acquired by Elliott Management for $6.50 a Share

Barnes & Noble to Be Acquired by Elliott Management for $6.50 a Share

Read more on The Wall Street Journal

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  • As a real estate play this acquisition makes sense. With half of their outlets being college book stores, having a distribution channel that exclusively serves college-aged consumers would be valuable to retailers like Trader Joe's, Sephora and Apple. I could easily see the new owners subdividing these

    As a real estate play this acquisition makes sense. With half of their outlets being college book stores, having a distribution channel that exclusively serves college-aged consumers would be valuable to retailers like Trader Joe's, Sephora and Apple. I could easily see the new owners subdividing these outlets and leasing the space as a collection of millennial-focused "in-store boutiques" with Sephora, Ulta or H&M tenants, along with a rotating assortment of pop-up stores.

    As for the remaining outlets, they could easily be converted into a shared-workspace format that would crush We Work overnight.

  • The pivot for Barnes and noble should have been shared working space. People already used them as a library... hanging out reading books. It was the wework before wework.

  • If anyone has visited the new Amazon brick-and-mortar stores in New York oh, they will see that there are still opportunities for retail. What is required to turn around Barnes & Noble is not only cash but also understanding the new generation of consumer retail and how it is integrated to the internet

    If anyone has visited the new Amazon brick-and-mortar stores in New York oh, they will see that there are still opportunities for retail. What is required to turn around Barnes & Noble is not only cash but also understanding the new generation of consumer retail and how it is integrated to the internet and a younger and different social phenomenon.

  • And yet in a recent Harris Poll we conducted, 68% of Americans have a library card...the highest percentage ever.

  • James Daunt of Wattersons knows his UK business and brought the company into profits. He closed branches but also opened others, brought in successful café concepts, wifi, and so on. He cut management overhead and brought in efficient distribution models.

    Barnes and Noble is whole different beast

    James Daunt of Wattersons knows his UK business and brought the company into profits. He closed branches but also opened others, brought in successful café concepts, wifi, and so on. He cut management overhead and brought in efficient distribution models.

    Barnes and Noble is whole different beast, however, way larger scale in revenue than Watterson. And the US is geographically... well, there is no comparison there. Which also means that the culture variables are vastly different. Mr. Daunt is about to push his limits on this one.

    Still, I believe this could end up being a good thing for Barnes and Noble. Like Best Buy, they could capitalize on what Amazon cannot: human interaction and physical locations that pull people in. And, while this year's sales have been flat, they have been turning a profit. When Wattersons was acquired and Daunt took over, they'd been bleeding red. He's got a bit more to work with here.

    Mr. Daunt, get ready for the ride of your life. Your airline miles are about to sky rocket and that's just while you're in the States.

  • Barnes and Nobles outlasted Borders (RIP) by more adroitly adapting to digital media and catering to intellectual toy lines. Unfortunately, they seem to have run out of innovation to prevent this imminent sale. Maybe they should have stuck to books, the real kind.

  • Not the B&N I grew up loving. This real estate story reminds us what we hate.

  • How have they lasted this long?

  • Finally....

  • They are on a downward spiral.