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They See It. They Like It. They Want It. They Rent It.

They See It. They Like It. They Want It. They Rent It.

Read more on The New York Times

Featured contributions

  • The rise of rental-focused subscription startups is a welcome trend. With more and more mainstream customers focusing on having less stuff and more high-quality items that are more available to them, there's less of an sentimental attachment to material goods (which, in the end, and with various exceptions

    The rise of rental-focused subscription startups is a welcome trend. With more and more mainstream customers focusing on having less stuff and more high-quality items that are more available to them, there's less of an sentimental attachment to material goods (which, in the end, and with various exceptions, of course, is healthier mentally).

    Add the Marie Kondo trendstorm and an industry that's among the most wasteful and economically unfriendly, the fast fashion industry, ends up suffering the most and needing to adapt.

    (Which, in my opinion, is a good thing.)

More contributions

  • We wrote a book in 2010 “Spend Shift: How The Post-Crisis Consumerism Will Change The Way We Buy, Sell and Live””. And we hit upon several early trends including ‘subscribing rather than buying’.

    But today Millennials and Gen Z are renting to access a broad array of higher quality goods than what is

    We wrote a book in 2010 “Spend Shift: How The Post-Crisis Consumerism Will Change The Way We Buy, Sell and Live””. And we hit upon several early trends including ‘subscribing rather than buying’.

    But today Millennials and Gen Z are renting to access a broad array of higher quality goods than what is affordable (e.g. rethink your ‘luxury consumer’), while meeting values of sustainability, being present and agility. From this (excellent) article: “We were raised to save and invest and buy a home and do all of these things,” said Miki Reynolds, 38, who pays a monthly fee for much of what she uses in her day-to-day life in Los Angeles. “But my mentality to currently rent — it’s not YOLO. It’s more living in the present as much as planning for the future because I feel like nothing is guaranteed.”

  • It makes perfect sense, the borrow-culture allows more sophistication in daily life as well as mobility career wise. You can take another job in a new city without the hassle of a full relo, rather just login and change your shipping address. Its brilliant.

  • I guess when you buy a thing, you can probably rent it too.