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Harvard Course Teaches Rich Millennials How to Do Good (and Make Money)

Harvard Course Teaches Rich Millennials How to Do Good (and Make Money)

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Contributions

  • Millennials faced with having to "persuade dad" of the merits of combining business with social good might want to keep these stats in their back pocket: 73% of CXOs we surveyed in 2018 reported having changed or developed products to generate positive societal impact. Here’s a profit-based proof point

    Millennials faced with having to "persuade dad" of the merits of combining business with social good might want to keep these stats in their back pocket: 73% of CXOs we surveyed in 2018 reported having changed or developed products to generate positive societal impact. Here’s a profit-based proof point: A majority of these CXOs said they had successfully generated new revenue streams from these socially conscious offerings. The takeaway? Business leaders are embracing a triple bottom line where purpose, planet and profit can—and must—coexist. After all, millennial and GenZ consumers—who make up more than half of the Earth’s population—are demanding it. They will start and stop relationships with companies for very personal reasons, often related to a company’s positive or negative impact on society.

  • Hmmm. How far can people stick their tongues down the back of the wealthy people's pants and gush about what "good work" they are doing? If you have to be able to afford to pay for this kind of class and you can't see the irony, you're quite literally, part of the problem.

  • No one wants to comment on it being a $12,000 course? For seemingly no reason other than the customer being able to afford it.

  • It certainly sounds like a fantastic program, hoping it continues to grow.

    $12K for one week sounds high until you consider the enrollees’ worth,

    more like a nickel or dime to take the course....

  • Having worked with family offices around the world, I have to agree that this is a really pressing issue.

    The millennial mindset is often very far from the older generation and this can lead to a disconnect and a lack of engagement. It’s not only wanting to convince their parents that they can make

    Having worked with family offices around the world, I have to agree that this is a really pressing issue.

    The millennial mindset is often very far from the older generation and this can lead to a disconnect and a lack of engagement. It’s not only wanting to convince their parents that they can make money by “doing good”, more important is to enable them to make investment cases that don’t come across as naive.

  • Glad multi generation money discussions are happening regardless of the motive .. and likely to become more common thanks to these kinds of programs

  • We have businesses that could use investment monies to build and be sustainable. Pretty much...global. They already do charity in their communities for various reasons but, the overarching philosophy is self interest. Not selfishness. Not self centeredness. Self interest is kin to self governed, a bed

    We have businesses that could use investment monies to build and be sustainable. Pretty much...global. They already do charity in their communities for various reasons but, the overarching philosophy is self interest. Not selfishness. Not self centeredness. Self interest is kin to self governed, a bed rock idea for stable economies in a stable land. Their idea is what all successful businesses are built. Self interest is the glue that binds them together.

    I invest in two things land and people. There is no greater creator than the one that takes dirt, massages it bringing in different nutrition, plants seed in this soil, tends the plant that produces a great tasting, clean tomato. Healthy plants in healthy and health giving soil, can't trump that. The opportunities are many. Look around you. See your community then start spreading out. This is fun work. Simply live your neighbor.

  • Interesting trend of purpose-driven investments combined with a sense of obligation by the worlds' ultra-wealthy.

  • “sustainable capitalism”... hm

  • Do good by doing less harm, not by doing well.