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The Wild-West Era of Streaming TV Is Ending

The Wild-West Era of Streaming TV Is Ending

Read more on The Atlantic

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  • It seems everybody is creating a new streaming service. My guess is that many of these will not be sustainable since most people will subscribe to only a small set and will settle on those with broad content, which will favor incumbents like Netflix, Hulu and HBO and sideline ones like CBS All Access

    It seems everybody is creating a new streaming service. My guess is that many of these will not be sustainable since most people will subscribe to only a small set and will settle on those with broad content, which will favor incumbents like Netflix, Hulu and HBO and sideline ones like CBS All Access. Also, the current glut of new content, some of it really good, means that most people will be fully content with one or two services.

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  • In the unstable future of this continuously emerging market, the real question is…how much longer will my sister let me use her login?

  • So, not to put too fine a point on it, but are these not just the "new" TV networks? Hulu and Netflix are flirting with inserting ads into our bingeing and it won't be long before, like the cable TV packages of old, we will at some point purchase bundles of streaming services at a monthly fee. Everything old is new again.

  • Streaming for me was/is about the freedom to choose. The freedom to be free from commercials. The ability to watch at my own pace.

    I don't want to have to be on my couch at a certain time of the week and a certain hour of the day. Then be interrupted continuously with ads.

  • We were always going to pay for our streaming habit, all that has changed is to which organization.

  • This story is based on the assumption that cord cutters have the same voracious appetite for every video product out there.

    All cord cutters do not. Some of us cut the cord because we recognized the medium for the massive time waster that it can be when consumed at previous levels. And some of us are

    This story is based on the assumption that cord cutters have the same voracious appetite for every video product out there.

    All cord cutters do not. Some of us cut the cord because we recognized the medium for the massive time waster that it can be when consumed at previous levels. And some of us are quite happy with the results.

  • We spoke about this some months ago. It was inevitable. The more spread out networks are, and the more streaming services we have, the higher the monthly bill to binge on shows.

  • So true. We started down the cord-cutter path and have begun to realize that we may not save much, if any, money. Will reevaluate as time goes on to assess what the best value is but all this fragmentation is starting to become worrisome.

  • Any consumer that was naive enough to believe that cutting the cord with ultimately save them the costs of cable, are going to have a rude awakening. Unless the consumer stops the impulsive and compulsive desire for pop culture and content, they are going to end up paying more a la carte than with Cable

    Any consumer that was naive enough to believe that cutting the cord with ultimately save them the costs of cable, are going to have a rude awakening. Unless the consumer stops the impulsive and compulsive desire for pop culture and content, they are going to end up paying more a la carte than with Cable simply because there is so much more content today. The consumer might be able to pray that the major players don't actually ever understand or learn from the Nash equilibrium, and that they start a battle of bundling and price cuts, but that is quite unlikely.

  • How much content can a family consume?

    Amazon Prime offers next day as a benefit, Netflix is the current king, and Disney with its content the 3rd pillar.

    I'd suspect that most people will subscribe to 1 or 2 and start being switch savvy, end one service and start another. This in itself is anathema

    How much content can a family consume?

    Amazon Prime offers next day as a benefit, Netflix is the current king, and Disney with its content the 3rd pillar.

    I'd suspect that most people will subscribe to 1 or 2 and start being switch savvy, end one service and start another. This in itself is anathema to the simplicity and the experience of on-demand content being, well, on-demand. A better appraisal is to see what happens after the fall out from so many streaming services. In the UK Sky (satellite TV) has a Netflix package showing the old and new guard are working to preserve each other.

    The other route is true micro-transaction based content viewing, say 5p to 20p per show. You could be subscribed to 'NetflixZero1' pay nothing for it just content you want.

    Netflix has arguably transitioned a Napster culture by allowing friends to screen leech or multiple free sign ups, that surely can't last? On that day though the evolution of TV and technical standards point to sterescopic 3D(?!?), VR, path choosing, redubbed content with mouth CGI and algorithmically updated content from yesteryear.

    We all could have been talking about Blockbuster subscriptions but those that stay static, get turned off.

    Also, books deserve a sequel!!!

  • Full circle in a decade:

    The death of cable channels and rise of all in one streaming

    The death of all in one streaming and the rise of OTT channels

  • Cable by another name...

  • This is a problem of greedy short-sightedness.

    This growing problem need not be inherent in subscriptions. It is due to excessive use of the flat-rate, all you can eat pricing model. Most of us rarely eat very much, so, as consumers, we face high risk of overpaying. Businesses find that easy to love

    This is a problem of greedy short-sightedness.

    This growing problem need not be inherent in subscriptions. It is due to excessive use of the flat-rate, all you can eat pricing model. Most of us rarely eat very much, so, as consumers, we face high risk of overpaying. Businesses find that easy to love, but it will eventually backfire. Even in the short run it limits their acquisition of customers and causes high churn. Not really very good for the business or the consumer!

    The future of subscriptions is to make them risk-free to the consumer. For digital services, the provider risks little except the opportunity to take money in exchange for no value. That will be less and less tolerated. A simple way to do that is clarified in "’Risk-Free’ Subscriptions to The Celestial Jukebox?” (https://www.fairpayzone.com/2019/03/risk-free-subscriptions-to-celestial.html)

  • The downfall of stocks like NFLX is coming as the cost of original content is piling up and fast. The price leverage isn’t there as customers have to keep paying for other streaming service. We may have reached peak NFLX.

  • I would suggest that it’s not just price that’s influencing this decision (for most households, anyways), but mainly the relevancy of content. Simply put, people are willing to pay premium to gain access to high quality shows (for example, HBO), while no one would pay for generic, considered-to-be-low

    I would suggest that it’s not just price that’s influencing this decision (for most households, anyways), but mainly the relevancy of content. Simply put, people are willing to pay premium to gain access to high quality shows (for example, HBO), while no one would pay for generic, considered-to-be-low quality content.

    And if the game is content relevancy, then the winners of this evolution will be the ones that are able to cater to many, and not to niche audiences only. Paying 15 dollars and having something to watch for every member of the household is the real deal. That’s why Disney needed Fox and Hulu, I guess.

    Yes, it will cost us more, probably. But you know what? The upside is that we’ll get to see amazing content being produced for us- And that is great news, to me.

  • Once was said that content was the king and distribution its kingdom. Well, now we do have a lot of Kings and Queens and several ways of making a strong kingdom, but will them last?

    As this topic gets enough attention given the outcome, tv content production is been overshadow by others departments

    Once was said that content was the king and distribution its kingdom. Well, now we do have a lot of Kings and Queens and several ways of making a strong kingdom, but will them last?

    As this topic gets enough attention given the outcome, tv content production is been overshadow by others departments with power enough to change multi-annual strategies based on solely online metrics.

    And I don’t have to go further explaining the problems many online companies are facing given their practices at managing data from their servers...

  • Streaming services are quickly becoming cable companies all over again. Its the circle of life!

  • We are entering a period where account sharing will thrive. Also piracy will significantly increase. And an approach used more and more often will thrive too - service switching. If a family consumes say a 100 hours of content per month, then they'll stay with one service for 1 to 3 months then jump

    We are entering a period where account sharing will thrive. Also piracy will significantly increase. And an approach used more and more often will thrive too - service switching. If a family consumes say a 100 hours of content per month, then they'll stay with one service for 1 to 3 months then jump to another, and another. The churn rate will be significant, and new marketing models that will stimulate impulse service jumping will arise. Not to speak about legal or illegal streaming service agregators and calalog providers allowing content discovery over multiple services, and providing proxy access to the one streaming desired content. Brave New world.

  • When at college, my cord-cutting setup consists of YouTube TV ($50/month) as well as a few steaming services (~$10/month each), so I end up paying $90-$120/month. I guess that's pretty similar to the cost of standard cable.

  • It seems to me that, despite the click bait premise in which it is couched, the articles real complaint is more with the one size fits all, every issue is a nail approach to alcohol use disorder than with the AA program.

  • That would be a pity but maybe it'll be good for all of us, addicted to the on-demand world. We will finally have time again to go out and chat with a friendly face in a bar.

  • Nothing is free.

  • Kodi is free so....

  • But the upside is that cord cutters are getting so much more content rather than 100 channels forced on them which they never watch.