Skip to navigationSkip to content
Close
Google Will Devote $1 Billion To Try To Tame Housing Costs In Bay Area

Google Will Devote $1 Billion To Try To Tame Housing Costs In Bay Area

Read more on NPR

Contributions

  • What this story fails to disclose is that the $250 million Google plans to spend will either be through an Opportunity Zone fund that will allow them to avoid capital gain taxes, or through tax credit purchases that will reduce their state and federal income tax obligations (and possibly allow then to

    What this story fails to disclose is that the $250 million Google plans to spend will either be through an Opportunity Zone fund that will allow them to avoid capital gain taxes, or through tax credit purchases that will reduce their state and federal income tax obligations (and possibly allow then to repatriate a lot of overseas income). If anything, Google's just doing what the banks and insurance companies have been doing for a few decades.

    As for their rezoning plans, I'm doubtful Bay Area counties are going to allow for the kind of density that would achieve a significant impact in supply.

  • If you can’t afford to live in one of these cities...the high paying job means nothing. The number of rickety RVs parked along the streets of San Jose is very telling. Unless this is addressed, California will continue to see an exodus out of the state for a better life.

  • A lack of affordable housing is one of the most important impediments to a higher quality of life in the SF Bay Area and many other urban areas. Restrictive zoning (which favors current homeowners) restricts the building of new supply. If Google and others can help to move the policy levers forward (beyond

    A lack of affordable housing is one of the most important impediments to a higher quality of life in the SF Bay Area and many other urban areas. Restrictive zoning (which favors current homeowners) restricts the building of new supply. If Google and others can help to move the policy levers forward (beyond this specific set of investments) to enable the building of more housing, this will be a great benefit.

  • Interesting that so many feel like it's worth criticizing a company for trying to impact a societal issue. Either for the impossibility of solving it as some put it, or with a cynisism related to the motive. Is there an allergy to hope here?

  • Weaponization of zoning laws is a problem in most major cities, but more so in California where the class division is more pronounced it's even worse. SF has nothing on LA, ill be interested to see if this model is replicable in other cities.

  • It gets a talent pool closer to the office and less stressed out and not living in RVs to work in silicon valley. Social win as well as a potential increase productivity.

  • Observe human reacting and adapting: Google employees are willing to commute 90 miles and live in RVs. Why? To be close to the Bay area office hubs. Building more units near existing offices - over a decade - will not meet the demand and puts even more pressure on infrastructure and increases all sorts

    Observe human reacting and adapting: Google employees are willing to commute 90 miles and live in RVs. Why? To be close to the Bay area office hubs. Building more units near existing offices - over a decade - will not meet the demand and puts even more pressure on infrastructure and increases all sorts of congestion. You will need more supermarkets, hospitals, entertainment... you get the idea. Homelessness will increase as more people are drawn in.

    Here's an alternative - build and distribute the hubs across the country in towns that have great infrastructure but a dearth of people. Let the market there create homes and businesses. Don't fish for tax breaks. This is the future of sustainability - remote hubs that are connected through super fast tech to more central offices.

    There's no good reason to keep building on "head quarters" in super concentrated cities. Weather? Really? People are willing to stay in RVs!!

  • If these companies are so good, why can't they build larger satellite worker hubs in other cities. Push their employees and contract partners with incentives to less dense areas where land is cheap. The solution isn't to push the "Valley" to even higher unsustainable population levels. Also put remote

    If these companies are so good, why can't they build larger satellite worker hubs in other cities. Push their employees and contract partners with incentives to less dense areas where land is cheap. The solution isn't to push the "Valley" to even higher unsustainable population levels. Also put remote work tools as a priority and come up with better solutions to the obstacles, like managers who don't have abilities fit for remote workers.

  • Ah, yes. I have read about this. It's called a company town. And, next will come the company spies making sure you aren't getting hammered every night.

  • Donate to...? They're doing this because the intention sounds noble or because it will cause affordable housing? Affordable housing is a result of lower cost and higher density development and/or investment in high speed mobility so that people can affordably live and work in different places.

    This

    Donate to...? They're doing this because the intention sounds noble or because it will cause affordable housing? Affordable housing is a result of lower cost and higher density development and/or investment in high speed mobility so that people can affordably live and work in different places.

    This is a donation that will cause that? Or they're just buying real estate and donating it so the costs are gone?

  • Good on Google for stepping up to the plate to address an issue. Bad on San Francisco for doing such a piss poor job, as governments are wont to do in literally every arena they get involved in.

  • I think that housing costs in San Francisco is the most expensive in the world.

    The people who can earn $10 million only can live affordable.

    I guess that most engineers will not want to join tech giant which is in San Francisco.