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Paige Vickers

Good evening. Here is your news brief.

A wild day in Washington

...but agreed with him on a trade deal... Democrats are claiming victory after reaching an agreement with the White House on an update to the 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement—but the Senate will not take it up this year due to president Trump’s impending impeachment trial, The Hill reports.

McConnell: Senate will not take up new NAFTA deal this year

As of Tuesday, the World Trade Organization's appellate body no longer has enough members to function because the US is blocking new member appointments. So WTO dispute rulings will not be enforceable going forward. With the global trading system under this kind of pressure, regional deals like USMCA

As of Tuesday, the World Trade Organization's appellate body no longer has enough members to function because the US is blocking new member appointments. So WTO dispute rulings will not be enforceable going forward. With the global trading system under this kind of pressure, regional deals like USMCA (new NAFTA) will become an even more important part of trade policy.

...and even insurance companies got in on the act. US health insurers sued the government for denying their claims—apparently failing to see any irony—saying that they are owed $12 billion for losses in connection to Obamacare's "risk corridors."

Health insurers fighting claim denials made some seriously ironic arguments at the Supreme Court

I couldn't help chortling in court today when the attorney for a bunch of US health insurers complained that there was nothing more pernicious than an insurance program that won't pay what's promised. HA! Americans would have had a good laugh if cameras were allowed in the courtroom. But they are not

I couldn't help chortling in court today when the attorney for a bunch of US health insurers complained that there was nothing more pernicious than an insurance program that won't pay what's promised. HA! Americans would have had a good laugh if cameras were allowed in the courtroom. But they are not so few got a chance to see insurers fighting the US government for allegedly promised funds and experiencing what the insured feel when dealing with health institutions.

Journalists love a deadline

Netflix hits and misses

Global tech battles for Africa

Energize your meetings with a power playlist

Judgement day for the world's most valuable fintech

Looking for a new job?

How safe are volcano vacations?

Matters of debate

Private companies shouldn’t bankroll the public good. Corporations can use their funding power in public-private partnerships to influence policymakers’ priorities, mask their own bad behavior, or even cause additional harm.

Why private companies should stop giving money for good causes

I don't think a blanket ban on public private partnerships is the solution. More transparency is. But done right, public private partnerships can help fund critical work for the social good that otherwise won't be funded.

There's no question that there's an underlying risk of bias and foul play behind public-private partnerships, but we're also in an age of accountability where customers are clamoring for transparency.

That desire can help these partnerships get better and take on the bad actors. It's ambitious, but

There's no question that there's an underlying risk of bias and foul play behind public-private partnerships, but we're also in an age of accountability where customers are clamoring for transparency.

That desire can help these partnerships get better and take on the bad actors. It's ambitious, but necessary, especially since we can put money to the right work.

Not all companies are as duplicitous as some the pharma companies that fund research into their own products. Some companies go so far as to obscure their participation on good works that have no relationship with their business. Companies are no better or worse than the people that run them . Each case

Not all companies are as duplicitous as some the pharma companies that fund research into their own products. Some companies go so far as to obscure their participation on good works that have no relationship with their business. Companies are no better or worse than the people that run them . Each case needs to be evaluated on its own merits

What is the real purpose of companies? Only their behavior can tell us. Employee and consumer expectations have changed and it won’t be long before business leaders are forced to catch up.

What is the real purpose of companies? Only their behavior can tell us

It will be interesting to see how companies measure success now that the Business Roundtable has challenged them to think differently about purpose. From my perspective, those that follow purpose like a north star and make decisions that go beyond the bottom line, will be positioned to win.

The purpose of corporations is being increasingly challenged. It can't merely be for shareholder returns. The Business Roundtable dropped shareholder primacy in August as the debate intensifies. Perhaps we are indeed all becoming Japanese, for when I arrived there in the 1990s they told me that the shareholder

The purpose of corporations is being increasingly challenged. It can't merely be for shareholder returns. The Business Roundtable dropped shareholder primacy in August as the debate intensifies. Perhaps we are indeed all becoming Japanese, for when I arrived there in the 1990s they told me that the shareholder wasn't the most important stakeholder, to the shock of my investor friends. Maybe we are returning to old values.

Roger Martin has said that there is a real market, where goods and services are made and traded, and an expectations market which looks further out and makes bets on what things will look like in the future. In the world of sports, these 2 markets are separate. But in the business world business managers often overtly intervene in the expectations market. For example by doing share buy backs in order to push the stock price higher. In a world of shareholder primacy, US companies have been putting all the gains from recent corporate tax cuts into buybacks instead of investment or employee wages which was allegedly the policymakers goal for the cuts. Western society is starting to acknowledge that there are other stakeholders apart from shareholders (and the board of directors who have a vested interested in doing buybacks to push up short term share prices). In a world of changing employee and consumer tastes and demands - whilst the economy appears unfair to many - I would expect these debates to continue.

Arts, letters, and the future

Time to ride off into that sunset...for now.

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Your Professional Decline Is Coming (Much) Sooner Than You Think

Your Professional Decline Is Coming (Much) Sooner Than You Think

Read more on The Atlantic

Contributions

  • This article describes one’s professional life as though it is one large endeavor of w a beginning/peak/decline despite the author himself having had three separate careers. Having different careers over one’s life is the way to stay engaged. Having multiple, simultaneous pursuits and shifting focus

    This article describes one’s professional life as though it is one large endeavor of w a beginning/peak/decline despite the author himself having had three separate careers. Having different careers over one’s life is the way to stay engaged. Having multiple, simultaneous pursuits and shifting focus is good too. Life is too long to pursue one career.

  • A must read piece on the professional ambition that drives much of us in DC but ultimately must be tamed for a fulfilling life. So much respect for the way in which Arthur Brooks the leader and social scientist lays out his findings including gems such as, “Careers that rely primarily on fluid intelligence

    A must read piece on the professional ambition that drives much of us in DC but ultimately must be tamed for a fulfilling life. So much respect for the way in which Arthur Brooks the leader and social scientist lays out his findings including gems such as, “Careers that rely primarily on fluid intelligence tend to peak early, while those that use more crystallized intelligence peak later... No matter what mix of intelligence your field requires, you can always endeavor to weight your career away from innovation and toward the strengths that persist, or even increase, later in life...To move from résumé virtues to eulogy virtues is to move from activities focused on the self to activities focused on others.”

  • Brilliant. I expected to work in my chosen profession until I was 70, but at 57 I bailed abruptly. I just couldn't, didn't want to, keep striving, keep on top. I now recognize that a lot of what I was feeling is what he describes here. I also felt something he doesn't mention, but maybe other people

    Brilliant. I expected to work in my chosen profession until I was 70, but at 57 I bailed abruptly. I just couldn't, didn't want to, keep striving, keep on top. I now recognize that a lot of what I was feeling is what he describes here. I also felt something he doesn't mention, but maybe other people feel - the certainty that my work (marketing communications for consulting firms, mainly focused on the topic of "innovation") was just BS that I emotionally couldn't do any longer. I had been fascinated by creativity and innovation for years, but one day I couldn't write one more word about business model innovation. I was in no way prepared financially for this. But life goes on, and so has mine.

  • A lot of important ideas for reflection and for preparing for that eventual decline after the age of 50. Nice to see that accumulated experience and what is called “crystallized knowledge” becomes more valuable as you age. Liked the idea of changing career to match that age-related usefulness. Be more

    A lot of important ideas for reflection and for preparing for that eventual decline after the age of 50. Nice to see that accumulated experience and what is called “crystallized knowledge” becomes more valuable as you age. Liked the idea of changing career to match that age-related usefulness. Be more like Bach and less like Darwin. Nice!

  • Who says you have to decline whe you can change direction. If you don't have to stop reinvent. I have had a few careers with success defined by interest, learning new things and having fun. Some of my more bohemian friends change completely going into acting music food writing. It is nice to have toys

    Who says you have to decline whe you can change direction. If you don't have to stop reinvent. I have had a few careers with success defined by interest, learning new things and having fun. Some of my more bohemian friends change completely going into acting music food writing. It is nice to have toys but the doings in your life are what makes you interesting .

  • “Dedicating more time to relationships, and less to work, is not inconsistent with continued achievement.”

  • From my perspective there’s an implicit bias, that this problem resides within the realm of those who have achieved a notable degree of success. The premise being that they’re the ones prone to decline and irrelevance.

    I believe the entire issue is far simpler. No matter what your chronological age

    From my perspective there’s an implicit bias, that this problem resides within the realm of those who have achieved a notable degree of success. The premise being that they’re the ones prone to decline and irrelevance.

    I believe the entire issue is far simpler. No matter what your chronological age or your degree of success, embedding your concept of self into your career or success is the short path to spiritual bankruptcy. If your sense of self is based in your simple worthiness as a person you will not become egotistical about some accolades nor will you bemoan their absence.

    If we truly believe that all people are equal then not placing false value on recognition becomes simple. You are what you are as a human. Not that you are because you’re the CEO or the assistant to the assistant sweeper. Human accomplishment has nothing to do with value. But if you falsely equate your worth with recognition and accolades you’re setting yourself up for an inevitable fall.

    Success is irrelevant to your value as a human. Period. If you get over yourself you can either accomplish much or accomplish little, it has nothing to do with your worth. You can’t fall off of a pedestal you don’t place yourself on to.

  • You need to constantly challenge yourself, grow, and evolve or you get stale and discarded.

  • This is changing. People used to think all great mathematicians peaked before 40, but now more are creative well into 50s.

  • This one is incredibly powerful and insightful. Never gave it this kind of thought.

  • This article seems to be very consistent with another one I came across not long ago about how "late bloomers" seems to be happier in life than "early accomplished". I feel that, like in this case, the former tend to stay " relevant" for longer. It also reminds me of a book I read years ago about the

    This article seems to be very consistent with another one I came across not long ago about how "late bloomers" seems to be happier in life than "early accomplished". I feel that, like in this case, the former tend to stay " relevant" for longer. It also reminds me of a book I read years ago about the "moonwalkers" and how they struggled later in their life when nothing seemed to top their early achievements.

  • Guess I homed in on thinking. Enjoyed the insights. I think it is linked to good food and health. The biome is the first brain. When we are young it can stand a lot of bad food like product. But the more we starve the biome in the large intestine the less fluid we become in our thinking. We become recalcitrant

    Guess I homed in on thinking. Enjoyed the insights. I think it is linked to good food and health. The biome is the first brain. When we are young it can stand a lot of bad food like product. But the more we starve the biome in the large intestine the less fluid we become in our thinking. We become recalcitrant. I see this in people my age which is the writer's age to have a more crystalized thinking. But honestly I don't see alot of thinking of any kind in my generation certainly not like Bach. Lots of drama with little to show for it. Also reading real page turned books have been shown to maintain and even improve cognitive skills. But I'm thinking gut health is a huge component to concise but flexible thinking. Nimble. Institutions stale and taint our thinking and drain our vitality.

    So, good, clean food is crucial to a healthy and nimble thinking.

  • The idea of giving up just because one gets old is just wrong -we need to keep going and do all we can to embrace the gift of life.

  • A wonderful read on the importance of developing a spiritual life in your 30-40s... so that when the trappings of our life’s success ( wonderful while we have them) slowly wanes because of our limitations, it is all the more important to recognize that the next chapter will be one of service and humility

    A wonderful read on the importance of developing a spiritual life in your 30-40s... so that when the trappings of our life’s success ( wonderful while we have them) slowly wanes because of our limitations, it is all the more important to recognize that the next chapter will be one of service and humility , which if we don’t remember leads us to feeling dejected in our later years

  • For me, as a "senior citizen" in the process of leaving a job I've had for the past 16 years, this article not only was well-timed, but it also tended to validate the largely unconventional choices I've made over time with regard to my education & employment.

    It's also interesting to note that my dad

    For me, as a "senior citizen" in the process of leaving a job I've had for the past 16 years, this article not only was well-timed, but it also tended to validate the largely unconventional choices I've made over time with regard to my education & employment.

    It's also interesting to note that my dad, earlier an entrepreneur and store owner, in later life became a consultant to help small businesses be successful--a service-oriented career he continues to enjoy and succeed in at an age about a decade and a half beyond the average male lifespan.

  • So the average of success as an entrepreneur is 45. I wonder what the correlation is with this in mind. People put more of everything it takes into it at that point? Just before riding off into the sunset?

  • Interesting concepts on aging and intelligence. What I don't see is ths correlation drawn between physical health and the functioning of the mind. Health and nutrition have a significant impact on mental agility.

  • One of the other challenges of fluid intellectual careers (being a Wall Street analyst is definitely one) is that you always are striving to out do your previous accomplishments and since the life and work requires being a road warrior, not being able to do that after hitting 50 creates a real psych

    One of the other challenges of fluid intellectual careers (being a Wall Street analyst is definitely one) is that you always are striving to out do your previous accomplishments and since the life and work requires being a road warrior, not being able to do that after hitting 50 creates a real psych out challenge that is difficult to overcome. The article suggests reinventing oneself to be relevant as Bach did. Wise recommendation and totally agree as am now in third or fourth career.

  • But i 3