Skip to navigationSkip to content

Driverless Cars May Be Coming, but Let’s Not Get Carried Away

By The New York Times

“We’ve tried to turn down the hype and make people understand how hard this is,” says Gill Pratt, an expert in robotics and head of the Toyota Research InstituteRead full story

Comments

  • Also share to
  • Erin Rey
    Erin ReySchool Counselor

    The more autonomy we lose, the more dangerous we become to ourselves and others when technology ultimately breaks down. I had to rent a car the other day and nearly got into an accident just because I am so used to my blind spot mirrors, back up camera and audio sensor alerts!

  • Weiyee IN
    Weiyee INChief Strategy Officer

    While investors are still looking for consolidation in the traditional automotive space, and new entrants continue to look to outflank traditional car companies with autonomous vehicles, it really is still important to remember that with all of the jockeying and hyper-competitive corporate maneuvers, inside of cars and on the highway are still human lives. Airbags were invented in the 1950s, and have been tested and retested for the past four decades and continue to be tested. After decades of tests

    While investors are still looking for consolidation in the traditional automotive space, and new entrants continue to look to outflank traditional car companies with autonomous vehicles, it really is still important to remember that with all of the jockeying and hyper-competitive corporate maneuvers, inside of cars and on the highway are still human lives. Airbags were invented in the 1950s, and have been tested and retested for the past four decades and continue to be tested. After decades of tests and research only very recent research has demonstrated that airbags were designed for human male occupants and have different impact results for women or younger people. There still needs to be a lot more testing, and that responsibility needs to be borne by the companies and industry with a careful governance framework and technology ethics.

  • John Gray
    John GrayFormer Banker Risk Management

    After all the hyper optimism a dose of reality . Mr Pratt is a brave man, I think he's right. I wonder what the industry will say.

  • Note the paradox of self-driving: As the technology gets better, it may initially become more hazardous, because drivers are sidelined for longer periods, lulled into a false sense of security

  • Paolo Carner
    Paolo Carner

    With the current state of technology (and regulations) I don't see how full capability can become a reality anytime soon! Try to drive in Paris or Rome in pick hours...

  • Matthew Donovan
    Matthew Donovan

    This has the potential to save more lives than the polio vaccine. Every parent who's lost a child to a simple absent minded moment and a missed stop sign. How many sober responsible people has drunk driving effected? The potential here to increase the efficiency of traffic movement and save lives is impossible to ignore. As a paramedic I welcome the day when a car with reaction times well beyond what humans are capable of is driving my kids to school.

Want more conversations like this?

Join the Quartz community for all the intelligence, without the noise.

App Store BadgeGoogle Play Badge
Leaderboard Screenshot

A community of leaders, subject matter experts, and curious minds bringing nuance back to how we talk about the news.

Editors' Picks Screenshot

No content overload: our editors will curate the most notable and discussion-worthy pieces for you every day.

Share Screenshot

Don’t just read the story, tell it: contribute your ideas and experience to the dialogue.