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U.S. Named One Of The World's Worst Trash Offenders In Alarming Report

By HuffPost

The U.S. creates three times the global average of waste despite representing just 4% of the world's populationRead full story

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  • Not surprised. US is so wasteful it’s sad and disappointing. I lived in Germany for 2 years and they had much stricter rules on recycling and trash collection. You have to sort your trash. And after being in Singapore multiple times and learning about how they deal with trash on such a small land mass, they have invested significantly in treatment and burn facilities where they incinerate their trash to generate electricity and somehow, through filters and technology, the smoke that comes out of

    Not surprised. US is so wasteful it’s sad and disappointing. I lived in Germany for 2 years and they had much stricter rules on recycling and trash collection. You have to sort your trash. And after being in Singapore multiple times and learning about how they deal with trash on such a small land mass, they have invested significantly in treatment and burn facilities where they incinerate their trash to generate electricity and somehow, through filters and technology, the smoke that comes out of those plant chimneys are cleaner than the air around it.

    Singapore is a great lesson for the rest of the world to invest in trash technology (pun intended) because it ain’t trash. Plastics are still a challenge of course but it’s amazing to see what Singapore has accomplished, so much of the world can learn from one another to help fight back for Mother Earth because she’s been fighting for us the entire time (watch One Strange Planet and you’ll weep for planet Earth, we are so lucky to be here because of 🌎 ).

  • Waste is the price of prosperity. Developed countries must take the lead in waste management and not let developing countries become the main recipients of the world’s waste

  • The US culture of consumerism that has prevailed for decades has a price, and that price is the disproportionate amount of waste produced. It will be difficult to curb our trash-y tendencies without some sort of incentive, either positive or negative.

  • Another way to spin this: the US contributes 12% of the world's trash while representing 24% of the world's economy.

  • A quick search shows plastic bags and bottles are the top items found in most garbage bags. There are 100% biodegradable bags out there. I know you would have to use a nylon bag a thousand times to make up for the energy it cost to make one. I'm not sure on how much energy a biodegradable bag cost. But the fact that they can decompose in 3 to 6 months is a lot better than the several hundred years of a plastic bag. Maybe we should go back to having milk in glass containers again or making glass soda

    A quick search shows plastic bags and bottles are the top items found in most garbage bags. There are 100% biodegradable bags out there. I know you would have to use a nylon bag a thousand times to make up for the energy it cost to make one. I'm not sure on how much energy a biodegradable bag cost. But the fact that they can decompose in 3 to 6 months is a lot better than the several hundred years of a plastic bag. Maybe we should go back to having milk in glass containers again or making glass soda bottles only. Glass does create more than 6 times the global warming gases than plastic and costs more to ship, but it's easier to recycle. The numbers suck to read but we may have to choose between the lesser of two evils. It's also going to take more discipline for people to change their ways and do better with recycling. Maybe we should just focus on the most common items found in garbage and find a way to decrease their use. A lot of companies probably don't want to go with glass because of the expense and it may hurt their bottom line. We've known this problem for a long time but obviously people and businesses out there aren't changing fast enough. Maybe we would have to use force in order to get people to use biodegradable bags and glass bottles instead of plastic. And by force I mean for the government the step in and make the use of plastic bags and/or bottles illegal for supermarkets and bottling companies.

  • Well, I always felt US has huge portions for everything- food, drink, cars, trucks and now thrash. I'm not surprised. 😀

  • So, if we take down our border defenses and just let anyone walk into the U.S. that wants to (as suggested by the left) the 4% population metric goes up.

    Logic tells us more people means more trash.

    Doesn't the article infer that the U.S. can't measure up to other countries in regards to waste management?

    The America hating left should be shouting " Hey, don't come here, we can't handle your trash. Stay in your clean home country."

  • Unsurprised; expected worse.

  • Unfortunately it is cheaper to throw away trash, than to recycle.

    Until the American populace is willing to make the changes, nothing will improve.

    We can't wait for the government to force us, we need to take personal responsibility and cut back on waste.

    Reuse, recycle, compost, what ever is needed, we can do better, and must for our kids and grandkids sake.

  • “There’s too much focus on recycling being the kind of silver bullet solution, which it is not,” Will Nichols, the firm’s head of environment, told The Guardian. “I think what we need to be working towards is almost a zero-material-footprint kind of society.”

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