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CEO corner

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

The business of travel

Live from the International Astronautical Congress

The latest on Brexit

WeWork gets worse

SoftBank takes over WeWork. The board of the shared office company chose the Japanese conglomerate over a competing offer from JP Morgan, the Wall Street Journal reports. Co-founder Adam Neumann will lose control of WeWork—but get a $1.7 billion payout.

Neumann to Get Up to $1.7 Billion to Exit WeWork as SoftBank Takes Control

Being a big fan of WeWork’s service, it is sad to see the devaluation hitting this level. Moreover, the payout to Adam N is beyond silly for a company that is going to need a major structural face lift.

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed to unrealistic valuations.

And now SoftBank will have to live with the creature it helped create...

Marking 30 years of the web

China's new place in the world

India's coal addiction

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet. Quartz explores how India is meeting the challenge of providing increasing amounts of energy to its people while trying to lower its dependence on fossil fuels. ✦

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular, has other motivations: from energy security to soft power.

Making immigration work

Improving culture at work

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The Deepening Crisis in Evangelical Christianity

The Deepening Crisis in Evangelical Christianity

Read more on The Atlantic

From Our Members

  • Interesting read despite the lazy shorthands on Thrasymachus and Nietzsche. The American Evangelicals have painted themselves in a corner way before Trump and even before the likes of Karl Rove and Bush Jr. came a long. The article cited St. Ambrose of Milan’s stance against the emperor, but a more apt

    Interesting read despite the lazy shorthands on Thrasymachus and Nietzsche. The American Evangelicals have painted themselves in a corner way before Trump and even before the likes of Karl Rove and Bush Jr. came a long. The article cited St. Ambrose of Milan’s stance against the emperor, but a more apt historical reference would be William Wilberforce. Offense is the best defense.

  • I very much hope Christians on the right are in crisis over Trump. Anything less renders their faith meaningless. However, it's hard for me to understand the American Evangelical persecution complex expressed in this piece (and comments) given how very Christian this culture looks to someone who is not

    I very much hope Christians on the right are in crisis over Trump. Anything less renders their faith meaningless. However, it's hard for me to understand the American Evangelical persecution complex expressed in this piece (and comments) given how very Christian this culture looks to someone who is not of the same faith and not born in this place and how comfortable they are about articulating their alienation. When you really are an outsider and powerless, you don't get to speak up about injustice even if you dared to and even if anyone cared and you certainly don't have the president's ear.

  • "Evangelicals may have been a cheap date, but at least Trump wanted them in the car." I wish I could remember where to attribute that quote.

    The article mentions elite culture as alienating Evangelicals; the problem is far more horizontal and pervasive than that. Every stratum of the progressive movement

    "Evangelicals may have been a cheap date, but at least Trump wanted them in the car." I wish I could remember where to attribute that quote.

    The article mentions elite culture as alienating Evangelicals; the problem is far more horizontal and pervasive than that. Every stratum of the progressive movement down to the grassroots is overtly and gleefully hostile to Evangelicals, unless they interpret their faith in ways that dovetail 100% with progressive goals. To test this, gauge your

    own reaction to the below:

    My own theological conservatism does not necessitate check-all-boxes political conservatism; I'm pro-trade, pro-immigrant amnesty, I wouldn't mind slavery reparations. I can affirm "black lives matter" without having to qualify it with "but all lives matter." I think Confederate nostalgia is ridiculous. I could go on.

    But here's where I stumble in election season. I'm deeply conflicted about the ethics surrounding abortion and bodily autonomy, in a way that I'm frankly afraid to even bring up in any left-leaning space. I'm nervous mentioning it here. I believe no one, not even myself, should have a legal right to "dignity" as handed down in Obergefell. I think transgender people should be allowed to serve in the military, but according to their physiology, not their felt identity. I approach regulation, taxation and state spending from an angle of skepticism.

    Where is my candidate? Scratch below the surface, have a genuine conversation with evangelicals, you'll find plenty wishing they had someone better than Trump to work with, who disagree with conservative orthodoxy in at least one important way. But who on the left even wants to hear from them?

  • When you lie down, again and again, with dogs you will undoubtedly wake up with fleas over and over—until you have no time for anything other than scratching.

  • Powerful inditement of Evangelical Christianity in the era of Trump and the lose of a generation for the church given the staggering disconnect between faith and politics summarized nicely here, “What is most personally painful to me as a person of the Christian faith is the cost to the Christian witness

    Powerful inditement of Evangelical Christianity in the era of Trump and the lose of a generation for the church given the staggering disconnect between faith and politics summarized nicely here, “What is most personally painful to me as a person of the Christian faith is the cost to the Christian witness. Nonchalantly jettisoning the ethic of Jesus in favor of a political leader who embraces the ethic of Thrasymachus and Nietzsche—might makes right, the strong should rule over the weak, justice has no intrinsic worth, moral values are socially constructed and subjective...”

  • If your worldview is one of everything being a zero-sum equation and you are motivated by fear that your tribe is losing people will side with whomever will bolster their tribe, even if it creates cognitive dissonance or exposes hypocrisy. Everything must be on one side or the other often with no room

    If your worldview is one of everything being a zero-sum equation and you are motivated by fear that your tribe is losing people will side with whomever will bolster their tribe, even if it creates cognitive dissonance or exposes hypocrisy. Everything must be on one side or the other often with no room left for compromise or dissent from the tribal line. Evangelical Christians should be in crisis because their embrace of Trump - a man who makes them question their professed values in a system where values are not supposed to be questioned.

  • Christians have always struggled between this world & the next. In Ender's Game, Col Graff argues " what does it matter If there's nothing left at all? When it's over we will have the luxury of debating morality...." The eternal question for struggling Christians & one we generally fail. A species isn't bread for extinction.

  • “We’re losing an entire generation. They’re just gone. It’s one of the worst things to happen to the Church.”