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Going on vacation won’t cure your burnout

By Quartz

Research shows that the psychological benefits of vacation tend to fade away fastRead full story

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  • If your field allows it, a longish professional vacation can do wonders. Taking a few months or a year to work on a different kind of team or project can get your mind working in wonderful new ways. And forcing yourself to step away from the day-to-day grind has the added benefit of proving that nothing

    If your field allows it, a longish professional vacation can do wonders. Taking a few months or a year to work on a different kind of team or project can get your mind working in wonderful new ways. And forcing yourself to step away from the day-to-day grind has the added benefit of proving that nothing will fall apart without your 12-hour days!

  • Fatigue and burnout are different things... Vacations and breaks help with the former, the latter is about finding meaning in what one does... And when that happens, even fatigue becomes more tolerable.

  • Setting personal boundaries with work, even for those of us who own our own companies is really difficult and burnout can clearly be dangerous to our health. Offline time, time laughing, or even just giving yourself permission to ‘waste time’ every once in a while is vital.

  • Smaller regular breaks during work or even after work hours are key. Vacations are not the cure of burnout

  • If the idea of going on—or ultimately returning from—vacation has you stressed, it might be an important sign to think about how you’re processing your work obligations.

  • Vacations and fatigue are similar to wearing down the lithium ion battery in your phone - the recharge becomes less and less effective and at some point it is really more a matter of burnout than fatigue. Vacation recharging usually lasts as long as the tan and without fundamentally removing the constraints

    Vacations and fatigue are similar to wearing down the lithium ion battery in your phone - the recharge becomes less and less effective and at some point it is really more a matter of burnout than fatigue. Vacation recharging usually lasts as long as the tan and without fundamentally removing the constraints of factors of stress you still end up hospitalized from work related stress or burnout (been there twice). Ultimately decide whether that particular job is really worth it, or find something more balanced to do.

  • It seems only natural that vacations provide no more than short-lived, temporal and maybe even placebo-like "cures." I haven't seen anyone leave for vacation in hopes of discovering some long-lasting solution to their current lifestyles, unless they're making a huge jump into digital nomadism.

  • Also depends on the type of vacation and who you went in the trip with. Running around to sights and scenes with family / friends can be EXHAUSTING. A few days off post trip is needed to recover

  • Vacation as a cure for burnout (or even fatigue) is a persistent myth. Stress, fatigue and burnout are ever present elements of work. Relief mostly requires finding ways to manage the negatives, while focusing on enjoyment and meaning in the positives.

  • It’s so bad that once back, I tend to wish I never went on vacation in the first place. That’s ridiculous.

  • Having just got back from holiday I have to agree with this.

  • Amen to to laughing and wasting time now and then. We are not hear long.

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