Skip to navigationSkip to content

The teen convicted in a controversial suicide texting case has appealed to the US Supreme Court

By Quartz

Michelle Carter was convicted of involuntary manslaughter for sending texts that encouraged her boyfriend to die by suicide. Now she's turning to the high court for helpRead full story

Comments

  • Also share to
  • HBO’s documentary does a fine job of explaining the defense’s side of the case. In the court of public opinion she is guilty, but she was

    **spoiler alert**

    the same age (a child)

    on anti-depressants

    practicing self harm

    struggling with an eating disorder

    socially isolated

    extremely vulnerable

    easily

    HBO’s documentary does a fine job of explaining the defense’s side of the case. In the court of public opinion she is guilty, but she was

    **spoiler alert**

    the same age (a child)

    on anti-depressants

    practicing self harm

    struggling with an eating disorder

    socially isolated

    extremely vulnerable

    easily influenced

    in the definition of an emotionally abusive relationship

    We should be focused on rehabilitation not projecting collective fears and fantasies of witch-like-powers onto a young woman whose brain was still developing at the time of this young man’s suicide (following multiple failed attempts). Someday she will write a book. And it will sell I predict.

  • Michelle Carter's case shocked the world. The teenager was convicted of involuntary manslaughter after urging her friend Conrad Roy to kill himself in conversations and text messages preceding his death. Now her lawyers are turning to the US Supreme Court for help, saying Massachusetts judges violated

    Michelle Carter's case shocked the world. The teenager was convicted of involuntary manslaughter after urging her friend Conrad Roy to kill himself in conversations and text messages preceding his death. Now her lawyers are turning to the US Supreme Court for help, saying Massachusetts judges violated Carter's free speech rights and due process protections, guaranteed by the US Constitution.

  • I still think that involuntary manslaughter is a very appropriate charge for what she did. If she had been charged with, say, murder I’d have more sympathy for her case. It is fair to bring the case to the Supreme Court because of how complex and emotionally fraught the case is, but I do believe that

    I still think that involuntary manslaughter is a very appropriate charge for what she did. If she had been charged with, say, murder I’d have more sympathy for her case. It is fair to bring the case to the Supreme Court because of how complex and emotionally fraught the case is, but I do believe that, while she obviously was suffering from her own serious mental illness, her actions did directly contribute to his death.

  • Complex legal case, made even more complicated by the fact that the defendant was a minor at the time. Arguments can be made for either side, but on a personal level, I hope she is held accountable. Reading the texts she traded with her former boyfriend prior to his suicide are seriously disturbing.

Want more conversations like this?

Join the Quartz community for all the intelligence, without the noise.

App Store BadgeGoogle Play Badge
Leaderboard Screenshot

A community of leaders, subject matter experts, and curious minds bringing nuance back to how we talk about the news.

Editors' Picks Screenshot

No content overload: our editors will curate the most notable and discussion-worthy pieces for you every day.

Share Screenshot

Don’t just read the story, tell it: contribute your ideas and experience to the dialogue.