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US plan to allow prescription drugs from Canada

By Boston Globe

The Trump administration says it will set up a system allowing Americans to legally access lower-cost prescription drugs from CanadaRead full story

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  • Adèle Salin-Cantegrel
    Adèle Salin-CantegrelFounder at scikoop

    I was really scared that this could increase the cost of Canadian drugs, especially insulin price for personal reasons... but we have regulations in place in Canada so hopefully that won’t happen.

  • Or…we could set up a system for allowing Americans to access low-cost prescription drugs in the U.S.

  • Matthew De Silva
    Matthew De SilvaReporter at Quartz

    Seems like Trump's action is in direct response to what Bernie Sanders said during the Democratic debate last night (July 30). Sanders said he took people to Canada and they could buy their medicines for 1/10 the US price.

  • Ray Mac Cormack
    Ray Mac CormackR.Mac.Photography

    Not really a great idea, when they really should be looking at why the prices are so high in the first place. Two things will happen the companies will just raise prices in Canada or Canadians will suffer supply shortages. Perhaps instead of crossing the border one should be looking at the pharmaceutical business model.

  • Maurice Willey
    Maurice Willey

    So, instead of really trying to fix the muddled mess of the American healthcare system we will just go and overload our neighbors' system? Whatta damned joke.

  • Jeff Vidler
    Jeff VidlerPresident at Audience Insights Inc.

    As a Canadian, I'd like to politely suggest the U.S. address the structural issues in their health care system before freeloading off of what we've been able to negotiate with big pharma.

  • Trenton Hammond
    Trenton Hammond

    A major reason prices are so high in the US is because companies exploit Americans in order to subsidize medicines in countries dubbed less prosperous. They also use this money to give away free medication to poor countries. Increased global competition and a decrease in time for patent ownership would help, but companies still suffer from the shareholder wealth maximization cult of modern business ideologies.

  • Dilip John
    Dilip JohnOwner at Apple's Heart Corporation

    Details scarce? So this is just floating an idea without any proof of seriousness. Just a distraction

  • Is making Canada a distributor the fastest first step approach to making prescriptions cheaper?

    Show us how it’s done Canada. Canadian healthcare is the new American dream.

  • Ross Whiteford
    Ross WhitefordBusiness Analyst

    Insulin, the development of which was pioneered in Canada by Frederick Banting, is far cheaper North of the border thanks to Government control (at a Federal and Provincial level) of pricing by pharmaceutical companies (anecdotally, the insulin patent was initially sold for $1). Canadians get the same quality of drug at a cheaper price, because our Government doesn't believe allowing gouging those of dependent on it. 'Trumponomics' appears to involve slightly loosening restrictions on cross-border

    Insulin, the development of which was pioneered in Canada by Frederick Banting, is far cheaper North of the border thanks to Government control (at a Federal and Provincial level) of pricing by pharmaceutical companies (anecdotally, the insulin patent was initially sold for $1). Canadians get the same quality of drug at a cheaper price, because our Government doesn't believe allowing gouging those of dependent on it. 'Trumponomics' appears to involve slightly loosening restrictions on cross-border sales to individuals, as opposed to taking on the pharma lobby in any meaningful way.

  • Ohwon Ohwon
    Ohwon OhwonCEO at Sigilan

    Optimization began with options and 45 has steadily shown that in truth, that's what's needed.

  • De’Andre Crenshaw
    De’Andre CrenshawRetail Managment at CVS Pharmacy

    This will provide some much needed competition to the pharmaceutical market, it’s about time Trump got on board with this idea, Dems have been rightfully calling attention to the issue, but shouldn’t let up. Trump still has done a lot to destabilize the entire healthcare market, and this is him attempting to change the narrative late in the game before the next election cycle. Dems should keep hitting home their work to improve over the course of his presidency while he, and his party have tried to repeal, with no replacement healthcare plan.

  • Rigged markets hurt consumers and undermine household budgets and macro-economies. Import-from-Canada is step one. Now, we need to prohibit price fixing and profiteering in the US health and pharmaceutical industries.

  • John Gray
    John GrayFormer Banker Risk Management

    Americans have been importing drugs from Canada for a long time and so far prices here have not risen.

    The complaint about quality control is confusing as Canadian laboratories sell into the US market. Given we live longer than our southern cousins the quality of our prescription drugs can't be bad.

    What is hard to understand is how American politicians cannot provide what their voters want. But that is a problem for the American voters.

  • Jose Granillo
    Jose Granillo

    Ugh. I hate it when I agree with 45.

  • Weiyee IN
    Weiyee INChief Strategy Officer

    Policies really should be made through cost benefit and risk analysis for the longer term rather than individual executive order. More than anything else the style of the policy making creates an increasingly centralized power structure that focuses decision making on single individuals rather than process.

  • Jennifer Renzi
    Jennifer Renzi

    I’ve read that other countries simply refuse to pay what American companies ask, so they make up for it by overcharging us.

  • Will van Ingen
    Will van IngenFounder at Northam Food Marketing

    Lobbying is not yet to be ended at the FDA to authorize a new imported product.

    An other powerful option to bring down drug prices:

    Pharmaceutical companies are often selling drugs in multiple countries and leaders are global.

    Any drug with the identical or equivalent active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sold from one same company in other countries at lower prices than the USA could be sold in the USA at the lower registered international price considering various comparative market criteria

    Lobbying is not yet to be ended at the FDA to authorize a new imported product.

    An other powerful option to bring down drug prices:

    Pharmaceutical companies are often selling drugs in multiple countries and leaders are global.

    Any drug with the identical or equivalent active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sold from one same company in other countries at lower prices than the USA could be sold in the USA at the lower registered international price considering various comparative market criteria remaining fair and simple (quality standards, market demand for a specific product etc).

    Obviously, general prices won't rise in the most competitive markets and consequently obligate to be competitive in the USA.

    Generally it's quite undecent to profit on badly needed drugs with high double or triple digit percentage. On one hand yes you do business, investments, risks and profits are to be made and surely can be confortables. On the other hand the health business is about people first and no business making profit should put people's health and life at risk just for even higher profits. Working in the health industry means people first, it's also vocational or else once should do something different.

    This measure which would call a bill would obligate a restructuring of the US market from the inside, not only cosmetics. The history shows that the industry will never change by itself. Importing from Canada will just do that but surely will face harsh impeding limits from the pharmaceutical lobbying money.

  • Should be good. In theory, this should force down prices of American drugs, as they’ll have to compete in an open market against equally-good but vastly less expensive competitors.

  • Rajul Alam
    Rajul AlamBusiness Analyst at Capita plc

    Good news for US citizens, not so great news for US pharmaceutical firms.

  • Curtis Klope
    Curtis KlopeInfo Security Engineer

    Clearly a response to Bernie... sigh

  • Fred Wein
    Fred Wein

    The one flawless business model of big pharma is great quality control.These rerouting of drugs from Canada has quality control issues written all over it.

  • Larry Larry
    Larry Larry

    Now it’s up to Canada to legislate permission to export drugs without endangering Canadian supply. The Fear of endangering the supply chain was why Canada shut down a Thriving drug export industry in 2005.

    There’s no way insulin prices should vary that much; neither in Canada should epipen for anaphylactic shock, cost $2000. This is gouging.

  • Steve  Potato
    Steve Potato

    I’m Canadian and on a few meds and am already having to deal with shortages. I’ve had this with three meds just this year. This idiocy will only make it worse.

  • Paul O'Brien
    Paul O'BrienCEO at MediaTech Ventures

    Sounds good to me! Need we politicize this? Done. Put it to bed. Yay us!

  • Patricia Lynne
    Patricia Lynne

    Isn't this something like the US paying their 'fair share'? Less prosperous countries pay less. Interesting, ain't it?

  • Curtis  Robb
    Curtis Robblooking for work

    Open it all up to competition and the prices will drop. Granted we will need some initial controls.

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