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How Jaywalking Could Jam Up the Era of Self-Driving Cars

How Jaywalking Could Jam Up the Era of Self-Driving Cars

Read more on The New York Times

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  • This increased jaywalking argument also assumes that an era where self-driving cars are the only vehicles on the road - the precondition that dictates unfettered jaywalking - will see the same number of vehicles being driven with the same regularity. One of the potential perks of self-driving vehicles

    This increased jaywalking argument also assumes that an era where self-driving cars are the only vehicles on the road - the precondition that dictates unfettered jaywalking - will see the same number of vehicles being driven with the same regularity. One of the potential perks of self-driving vehicles would be reduced ownership and the creation of a "car on demand" service, where a vehicle could be hailed as necessary. This would pair neatly with ridesharing, and allow for more efficient vehicle use - even single person trips could be tailored for "last mile" transit or walking if the car could park itself autonomously - and decrease the volume of vehicles on our streets; allowing for creation of more pedestrian (and cyclist, scooter, skateboard) friendly "complete streets" with fewer vehicles and less congestion.

  • If driverless cars are so perfect at avoiding obstacles, people will start crossing roads and repealing jaywalking laws (as there will be no need for them), grinding cars to a halt

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  • The pedestrians might get a surprise when sensors fail or the software doesn't get updated. Don't forget auto parts are made at the lowest possible cost.

    I presume this will alleviate the organ shortage for transplants.

  • This is a fascinating unintended consequence of self-driving cars I never thought of (and would definitely be a real problem in jaywalk-happy NYC): "if pedestrians know they’ll never be run over, jaywalking could explode, grinding traffic to a halt."

    Another potential unintended consequence is that

    This is a fascinating unintended consequence of self-driving cars I never thought of (and would definitely be a real problem in jaywalk-happy NYC): "if pedestrians know they’ll never be run over, jaywalking could explode, grinding traffic to a halt."

    Another potential unintended consequence is that fewer accidents will result in fewer organs available for transplants. What else aren't we thinking about when it comes to AVs?

  • It’s not just NYC that’s jaywalk happy. There are plenty of places on the East Coast where the unwritten rule is for pedestrians to cross the road or highway whenever something isn’t coming. Focusing AV behavior on other drivers is a mistake. Pedestrians will cross the road where convenient and a big

    It’s not just NYC that’s jaywalk happy. There are plenty of places on the East Coast where the unwritten rule is for pedestrians to cross the road or highway whenever something isn’t coming. Focusing AV behavior on other drivers is a mistake. Pedestrians will cross the road where convenient and a big problem (and contributor to jaywalking) is road design by non-pedestrians: lack of lights, designated crossings placed very far (1/2 mile or more) apart or completely absent, car-friendly but pedestrian-hostile local rules (like right turn on red permitted) and a complete lack of standardized traffic rules with universal recognition. All of that really needs to be fixed or AVs will end up causing a lot of deaths.

  • Cities should be given back to people not designed around cars.

  • Unpredictable scenarios / how long will it take until the card can predict them?

  • My initial reaction to the headline was that Jaywalking pedestrians would be the leading liability issue, but discovered the AVs will almost never hit a pedestrian and that will lead to Jaywalking New York Style everywhere. But this looks at the future, and l think States and insurance companies will

    My initial reaction to the headline was that Jaywalking pedestrians would be the leading liability issue, but discovered the AVs will almost never hit a pedestrian and that will lead to Jaywalking New York Style everywhere. But this looks at the future, and l think States and insurance companies will mandate V2V system controls even if Washington does not. Maybe reach 50% hands-off driving when? 16, 24 30 years? 2036, 2044, 2050?