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Climate change: narrate a history beyond the 'triumph of humanity' to find imaginative solutions

Climate change: narrate a history beyond the 'triumph of humanity' to find imaginative solutions

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  • I've always looked at patterns and bigger context. We are far too educated in isolating narrow phenomena to study. We are all specialists. As a child my brain rejected this. I could never really figure something out unless I understood the context, the system or ecology in which it existed. Then the

    I've always looked at patterns and bigger context. We are far too educated in isolating narrow phenomena to study. We are all specialists. As a child my brain rejected this. I could never really figure something out unless I understood the context, the system or ecology in which it existed. Then the Buddhists confirmed the merit of that: a flower is not just a flower, it is composed of the soil, the clouds, the sky and even dying animals. This article encourages us to look at big history and different paradigms for dealing with the Ecological crisis.

  • This is an opinion piece, although not clearly stated as such. However, the immense amount of context, balance, and sources within this article makes it a great read overall for a new perspective. Full review here: credder.com/article/2611

  • The article is coming from a good place, and the author is on the right track, but I thoroughly disagree with its framing (and titular premise).

    The “triumph of humanity” narrative, as the author terms it, is unlikely to go away for the very simple reason that it’s true. The arc of history does bend

    The article is coming from a good place, and the author is on the right track, but I thoroughly disagree with its framing (and titular premise).

    The “triumph of humanity” narrative, as the author terms it, is unlikely to go away for the very simple reason that it’s true. The arc of history does bend toward progress. The problem is not that people have faith in the future triumph of the species as a culmination of all our millennia of existence, it’s that many people (I would argue as a result of deeply insufficient history education) have a very narrow, naive view of what humanity “triumphing” actually looks like.

    Climate change is an existential threat, and largely one of our own making. The exponential growth of the past two centuries, following the Industrial Revolution, came at an ecological cost, one we only now are seeing at its true scale. It will take spectacular change and tremendous, concerted effort to rebuild our system into a more sustainable, equitable, and just plain better version of itself.

    But that does not mean that we must abandon our idealistic belief that history bends toward progress. It merely means that we must recognize and accept that “progress” isn’t going to look the same as it did 25, 50, or 100 years ago— in fact, this is exactly the lesson history teaches us.

    Real progress, real triumph, has ALWAYS come from change; the status quo merely propels us from one change to the next. Saying we should look “beyond” that narrative does not advance our societies— it merely caves to the delusion that past progress came from preserving and advancing the status quo.