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How to talk to employees about the future of work

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  • I went to interview Robert Falzon thinking we would be talking about the future of work, but instead he told me about the fascinating conversations that are happening RIGHT NOW to get employees prepared for the changes ahead.

    As a journalist who lived through the transition from print to digital, I

    I went to interview Robert Falzon thinking we would be talking about the future of work, but instead he told me about the fascinating conversations that are happening RIGHT NOW to get employees prepared for the changes ahead.

    As a journalist who lived through the transition from print to digital, I can tell you it did not inspire confidence to hear dire warnings from leadership that our jobs would change, without any specifics as to how, or as to how we might prepare. So I especially appreciate that there are companies thinking carefully not just about how the world is changing but about how they plan to change with it, and about how they will need their employees to come along with them for the ride—because as Falzon says, if big employers undertaking big transitions think they'll be able to hire externally for all of their future talent needs in an AI world, they're very likely fooling themselves.

  • So much here on careering, leadership and the desirability of life-long learning. Every word applies equally to companies and to individuals: "if you’re solving ahead every three years, you’ll be ahead of most of your competition because they’re not even doing that."

  • Reskilling and upskilling is extremely important right now. IT departments that moved to the agile methodology years ago are now seeing themselves as lean, with less of a demand for certain roles. This is a good thing because the companies/departments succeeded at what they set out to do. The fact that

    Reskilling and upskilling is extremely important right now. IT departments that moved to the agile methodology years ago are now seeing themselves as lean, with less of a demand for certain roles. This is a good thing because the companies/departments succeeded at what they set out to do. The fact that companies are looking to retain talent by choosing to have them train for roles they anticipate needing for future endeavors is reassuring. They could easily bring an external candidate in to help fill these new roles, but choosing to upskill and reskill will maintain their culture and employee morale.

  • It’s not easy to break down jobs into tasks and then figure out what should be automated versus where humans should be augmented. Skills are one lens but it’s also about understanding where the AI capability is heading and how people react to AI + humans. There just aren’t many tools out there to use

    It’s not easy to break down jobs into tasks and then figure out what should be automated versus where humans should be augmented. Skills are one lens but it’s also about understanding where the AI capability is heading and how people react to AI + humans. There just aren’t many tools out there to use. This is an interesting interview because it hints at the need for more flexible and intuitive ways to govern a workplace and product offering that’s a mix of humans and A.I.

  • A really good interview with an executive who has clearly thought through many of the implications of technological change and how it will disrupt either corporates or even the fabric of society. As a former Wall Street analyst, it is really very encouraging to see senior management being forward-looking

    A really good interview with an executive who has clearly thought through many of the implications of technological change and how it will disrupt either corporates or even the fabric of society. As a former Wall Street analyst, it is really very encouraging to see senior management being forward-looking and strategic in addressing these issues.

  • A refreshingly candid response to the question: "How will automation affect employees?"; especially coming from a C-suite boss.

  • Lots of companies are sending proven good employees for upskilling. Nothing new and nothing unexpected. Technology changes but the qualities of what makes a good employee hasn’t in a few hundred years. Employers generally want to keep the good ones so they will invest in training and keep them up to

    Lots of companies are sending proven good employees for upskilling. Nothing new and nothing unexpected. Technology changes but the qualities of what makes a good employee hasn’t in a few hundred years. Employers generally want to keep the good ones so they will invest in training and keep them up to date on changing roles and responsibilities.