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A California police robot is flagging “blacklisted” people and cars

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  • The world is heading into two sets of audience, people who demand privacy is their right and another set where everything is public. This robo-police is the example of second one, and we will see more and more incorporation of AI for using facial recognition for taking some action. In this case, detecting

    The world is heading into two sets of audience, people who demand privacy is their right and another set where everything is public. This robo-police is the example of second one, and we will see more and more incorporation of AI for using facial recognition for taking some action. In this case, detecting criminals and crime scene...

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  • This is what happens when you have an uneducated group of people who are easily swayed by industry-types who use former police officers and former military people to do their sales and lobbying.

    Why do we allow such a largely uneducated bunch (police officers) to make decisions like this? We should

    This is what happens when you have an uneducated group of people who are easily swayed by industry-types who use former police officers and former military people to do their sales and lobbying.

    Why do we allow such a largely uneducated bunch (police officers) to make decisions like this? We should require that our police forces have a broader-based education (and no, a night-school criminal justice AA/BS would not count). Wouldn’t it be great if we had public safety officials who had a Liberal Arts education as a foundation? Might help some of the bias issues too. Might also help some Liberal Arts majors out there who are having difficulty in the job market.

  • Here are all your sci-fi nightmares in real life. Not only is there a robo-cop patrolling the streets but it's being marketed as superior to humans because it never takes vacations. Law enforcement's confidence in technology is astonishing, given that no one knows better than cops how fraught and difficult

    Here are all your sci-fi nightmares in real life. Not only is there a robo-cop patrolling the streets but it's being marketed as superior to humans because it never takes vacations. Law enforcement's confidence in technology is astonishing, given that no one knows better than cops how fraught and difficult their job is. But the best comes last here. I don't want to spoil it, however, rest assured, this is worth reading to the very last word.

  • The Knightscope K5, weighing 400 lbs and measuring 5 ft 2 inches tall (181 kg, 157 cm), is called an “autonomous data machine” by its Silicon Valley-based manufacturer. It’s “constantly on the prowl for suspicious activity and is a visual deterrent to would-be troublemakers and criminals.” 

  • There is a lot of good that can come from this technology and its implementation. What is needed is far better benchmarks and a better set of technology ethics and a governance framework. Getting alarmist about science fiction and dystopia is only going to lead to paranoia and Hysteria, akin to Luddites

    There is a lot of good that can come from this technology and its implementation. What is needed is far better benchmarks and a better set of technology ethics and a governance framework. Getting alarmist about science fiction and dystopia is only going to lead to paranoia and Hysteria, akin to Luddites of the industrial revolution. And what will end up happening is bad elements with malicious intent will take advantage of that Luddite movement and create havoc and tragedy.

  • Wouldn't worry too much if it's like a cell phone the software updates will need updates the tech will be obsolete the camera lens will fog up and the battery might catch fire. Depending on the law snooping on I P addresses usually requires a warrant.

  • Bring forth the Daleks!

  • Someone just hit the lens with a hammer. Problem solved. Oh and wear a mask

  • Is this a good idea? I really don’t think so.