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How googly eyes solved one of today’s trickiest UX problems

By Fast Company

A little robot at a library in Helsinki went from reviled to beloved, all because he got a new pair of plastic eyesRead full story

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  • Artificial intelligence and robotics should enhance, not diminish, the human experience. With that in mind, it’s good to know that it doesn’t always take a wholesale reworking of hardware and software to bring robot and human together – sometimes, just a thoughtful tweak based on an understanding of

    Artificial intelligence and robotics should enhance, not diminish, the human experience. With that in mind, it’s good to know that it doesn’t always take a wholesale reworking of hardware and software to bring robot and human together – sometimes, just a thoughtful tweak based on an understanding of human nature will do. Today, we’re talking about a library assistant; tomorrow, the same thinking could apply to all sorts of intelligent systems. The end result is a world that works better for all of us.

  • A project that I was part of, touch panel vending machines, approached from a similar angle- animated eyes made the machines more relatable and prevented from vandalism.

    https://www.designboom.com/design/acure-digital-vending-machine/

    It also served more functional purposes, such as guiding users what

    A project that I was part of, touch panel vending machines, approached from a similar angle- animated eyes made the machines more relatable and prevented from vandalism.

    https://www.designboom.com/design/acure-digital-vending-machine/

    It also served more functional purposes, such as guiding users what to do next, reducing stress from waiting while loading or dispensing...

    You can still see many of these vending machines around Tokyo, but not with faces much anymore. After people getting used to these touch vending machines, humanized approaches are not necessary.

    There are some robot products focusing on humanized communication... and unfortunately, they are gone by now or suffering.

    Kuri, ElliQ, Vector from Anki... but these robots were meant to be human... first.

    At least, personified elements were added to functioning robots in the case of this robot in the Helsinki library.

  • “Rather than trying to mimic a human expressions entirely, the eyes help people make the mental switch toward treating the robot differently. The low-fi approach, embodied by the big, cartoonish eyes, also helps clue visitors in to the fact that the robot’s not as smart as a person.”

  • It’s the Wall-E effect. Nobody can resist large and circular, or (preferably) inverted teardrop eyes.

  • Happy little helpers, that's what robots should be.

  • I guess part of technology adoption in general requires the ability to relate to familiar concepts and processes. Remember the whole design principle of the early iPhone apps? (Skeuomorphic) the calendar was meant to look like an old journal instead of today’s more streamlined (flat) design.

    So anthropomorphic

    I guess part of technology adoption in general requires the ability to relate to familiar concepts and processes. Remember the whole design principle of the early iPhone apps? (Skeuomorphic) the calendar was meant to look like an old journal instead of today’s more streamlined (flat) design.

    So anthropomorphic features might be the analogous process for robots and AI in this early stage of adoption.

  • "Rather than trying to mimic a human expressions entirely, the eyes help people make the mental switch toward treating the robot differently. The low-fi approach, embodied by the big, cartoonish eyes, also helps clue visitors in to the fact that the robot’s not as smart as a person.”

    Interesting approach

    "Rather than trying to mimic a human expressions entirely, the eyes help people make the mental switch toward treating the robot differently. The low-fi approach, embodied by the big, cartoonish eyes, also helps clue visitors in to the fact that the robot’s not as smart as a person.”

    Interesting approach, plus who doesn't love googly eyes?

  • Face / facial attribute as an extention of humanity

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