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This gadget scans your trash to tell you if it’s recyclable

This gadget scans your trash to tell you if it’s recyclable

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Contributions

  • Every household should have this. It even has a chip for the recycling capabilities of the region you are in. Evan as an avid recycler, I get confused sometimes trying to remember the intricacies of the system. This is a great solution.

  • Well, this device is a bit like putting the cart before the horse by shifting the onus on the consumer at the moment when s/he stands by the trash can.

    Better product labeling can help raise awareness which products, or parts of them, including packaging, are recyclable before they're being bought

    Well, this device is a bit like putting the cart before the horse by shifting the onus on the consumer at the moment when s/he stands by the trash can.

    Better product labeling can help raise awareness which products, or parts of them, including packaging, are recyclable before they're being bought.

    But the best starting point is to give this device, in one form or other, to product designers, engineers, and product managers and have them declare, in an open and transparent way, how their decisions contributed to the recyclability of the product they're creating and releasing into the market; and on what material has been reduced, or removed entirely.

    Conscious purchase decisions in the shop can go a long way to prevent leakage in the circular economy before relying on gadgets.

  • Do you think this could be better than getting rid of single-use plastics?

  • This needs to be focused on locales to be effective as rules are different everywhere on recyclables.

  • It could also foster brands to go for a recyclable packaging to avoid negative perception and a great teaching tool all schools could have too for kids.

  • I don't want to be contradictory but isn't this just another plastic gizmo that will end up in the recycling bin if it doesn't contain hazardous material.

    Perhaps even if the system that forces recycling instead of rewarding it persists, the onus for sorting should be at the central recycling plant

    I don't want to be contradictory but isn't this just another plastic gizmo that will end up in the recycling bin if it doesn't contain hazardous material.

    Perhaps even if the system that forces recycling instead of rewarding it persists, the onus for sorting should be at the central recycling plant. Here would be a appropriate use of automation.

  • This is a great solution to fixing the beast that is recycling. Someone tell me how to fund this once there is a working prototype.

  • Interesting