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Alibaba designers used AI to shape New York Fashion Week looks

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Contributions

  • It was surprising to me to see this story without a mention of Trendalytics and other technology that has been in this space for a long time. A data-informed view of aesthetics may actually be an antidote to fast fashion, as we find the more stable preferences that break the media’s ability to guide

    It was surprising to me to see this story without a mention of Trendalytics and other technology that has been in this space for a long time. A data-informed view of aesthetics may actually be an antidote to fast fashion, as we find the more stable preferences that break the media’s ability to guide our preference simply to drive consumption.

  • Can a machine predict what people will want to wear six months from now? Perhaps yes, especially if it has billions of data points from millions of shoppers to inform its choices. Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce giant is using fashion AI to helps designers it works with see the future now, and showing

    Can a machine predict what people will want to wear six months from now? Perhaps yes, especially if it has billions of data points from millions of shoppers to inform its choices. Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce giant is using fashion AI to helps designers it works with see the future now, and showing those looks at New York Fashion Week.

  • I ask the question, what does it mean to innovate? Should the consumer choose the design, or is it a visionary who can create something they never knew they wanted.

    This AI will regurgitate ideas, never creating newness or fresh concepts. A dangerous rabbit-hole.

  • Not to be confused with 'design by committee' (because that means every input receives the same weighting), running large amounts of data through AI algorithms can bring previously unseen patterns to light (through unsupervised learning, not just regression or classifications), giving designers an opportunity

    Not to be confused with 'design by committee' (because that means every input receives the same weighting), running large amounts of data through AI algorithms can bring previously unseen patterns to light (through unsupervised learning, not just regression or classifications), giving designers an opportunity to respond to. So, good move, Alibaba.

    I don't see this as AI taking away the creative act from the designer; instead, the AI is nudging the designers into a direction not previously considered.

    It'd be interesting to understand if these nudges align with a designer's hunch.

  • I agree with Bliss Lau wholeheartedly. There’s a time and a place for fandom - where the fans and audience command the story, which can happen in certain franchise and genre films and especially television shows. But to think that the trickle down effect of fashion’s brightest tastemakers can be turned

    I agree with Bliss Lau wholeheartedly. There’s a time and a place for fandom - where the fans and audience command the story, which can happen in certain franchise and genre films and especially television shows. But to think that the trickle down effect of fashion’s brightest tastemakers can be turned upside down like a sand timer will not ignite creativity and might ultimately leave the customer very unsatisfied. That’s why we have professionals in different professions. Not everyone is a filmmaker or a designer and people often need to be introduced to what they like before they know they like it.

    You need forecasters and designers because they pull from unexpected places and their inspirations are not clustered into a dataset based *only* on other people’s tastes. That’s still valuable. It’s worth taking a risk on from an investment POV. AI is not the only compass but could be a great add-on.