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The language you speak changes how informative you can be

By Quartz

Researchers studied 17 languages with a huge range of tones, syllables, and soundsRead full story

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  • Comprehension plays a big role. Thus the article stating that ‘....overall, humans get the some amount of information across in roughly the same amount of time.’ Information density varying is irrelevant if we as people are not developing how quickly we can process.

  • The idea that speed is proportional to the amount of information conveyed makes some sense. It wouldn’t be reasonable to assume that Japanese speakers are thinking and/or communicating faster than the Vietnamese. We are all evolving together and therefore our brains can take in and comprehend roughly

    The idea that speed is proportional to the amount of information conveyed makes some sense. It wouldn’t be reasonable to assume that Japanese speakers are thinking and/or communicating faster than the Vietnamese. We are all evolving together and therefore our brains can take in and comprehend roughly the same amount of information as everyone else. It does make sense that speed would generally slow down if there’s more information packed into each syllable. But apparently English and French have the highest information rate, though that confuses me somewhat because French seems to use a lot more words to say the same thing. If you look at the same book translated into English and French, the French book will be noticeably thicker. But English has nearly five times as many words (not hard to achieve when ‘bootylicious’ is defined as a word in English dictionaries). Is the amount of information conveyed as important as the quality of the information and if so, by which ways do we measure quality?

    I prattle a bit. But I adore talking to people who remind me to slow down when they speak solidly and deliberately, without much waste. I think that’s a hidden takeaway from the article

  • Curious if the information rate is supplemented by gestures in some languages...

  • I believe that when one speaks multiple languages this becomes clear. Listen to many cultures which have had a long exposure to English. Speakers tend to incorporate English words and phrases in order to compress information transmission.

    Fascinating topic though.

  • Another reminder to speak slowly when trying to convey complex ideas. The language you choose and how fast you speak can make a difference in the rate of information you convey. Interesting to see that French and English are equally efficient

  • Found a book Studies in Words, by CS Lewis. He discusses the ramifications of thought on words. Which ties nicely with comprehension rate. Words such as nice, take on additional definitions/meaning for culture. It has taken on the word kind and it's clear difference from nice. But our collective will

    Found a book Studies in Words, by CS Lewis. He discusses the ramifications of thought on words. Which ties nicely with comprehension rate. Words such as nice, take on additional definitions/meaning for culture. It has taken on the word kind and it's clear difference from nice. But our collective will use these words interchangeably. Knowing how a word is being used is crucial to rate of comprehension. Words have specific meaning for each of us to understand one another. I've used, kind and nice before. Kind for centuries means useful. Nice is from nicety/pastry so can interchange with sweet. Now, kind is less used and to many, nice has taken its meaning. This can be confusing from one generation to the next when communicating. The word perfect, again for centuries, means mature not flawless. But we use it today to express flawless and mature is rarely thot of when we speak and write.

  • This research is so great that it explains with one graph why I felt so calm using English as a native Korean😂😂👍

  • “humans get the some amount of information across in roughly the same amount of time”

    Interesting

  • Communication

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  • Very informative

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