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The best way to correct your boss when they’ve made a mistake

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  • These are all great suggestions however I do feel knowing your boss and how they'll respond to criticism is also important. Some bosses welcome corrections; some flip out at the slightest suggestion they may have been wrong.

  • Good advice, but to be honest if you've got a boss who flips out over being corrected or receiving constructive feedback, it's time to change jobs.

  • Good advice on tactfully pointing out a mistake—but is there any part of this that doesn’t also apply to bosses correcting their employees?

    You should be polite no matter who you’re talking to. The notion that bosses are these uniquely fragile creatures who might burst into a million pieces (or turn

    Good advice on tactfully pointing out a mistake—but is there any part of this that doesn’t also apply to bosses correcting their employees?

    You should be polite no matter who you’re talking to. The notion that bosses are these uniquely fragile creatures who might burst into a million pieces (or turn around and fire you) if you point out their mistakes seems a little silly to me. If you can’t handle feedback, maybe you shouldn’t be getting paid to be a manager.

  • A good boss will undoubtedly be very occupied but not only should they be aware of all these things themselves, but help educate those just entering the work force. & while all valid I think most important are 1) speaking privately and 2) pick your battles

  • Number 5, speak privately, is so instrumental when dealing either with a superior or a subordinate. It creates a more potentially stable environment, doesn’t put people on the spot, and is generally far more respectful.

    The adage of “praise in public, punish in private” is timeless wisdom for a reason

    Number 5, speak privately, is so instrumental when dealing either with a superior or a subordinate. It creates a more potentially stable environment, doesn’t put people on the spot, and is generally far more respectful.

    The adage of “praise in public, punish in private” is timeless wisdom for a reason. For when you seriously need to address someone, doing so discretely in private helps take away the likelihood for loss of face, potential public displays of intended or unintended disrespect, and is far more considerate in general.

    Many times one must manage egos, and this is an important tactic to increase the possibility of a positive outcome.

  • Excellent advice. I would simply emphasize that timing is incredibly important. Your boss should always feel you have their back and are respecting their position, so doing this behind closed doors or amongst trusted peers is important. Also, I would add that there are almost always ways to frame a discussion

    Excellent advice. I would simply emphasize that timing is incredibly important. Your boss should always feel you have their back and are respecting their position, so doing this behind closed doors or amongst trusted peers is important. Also, I would add that there are almost always ways to frame a discussion like this so it comes across as supportive and helpful v directly pointing out a mistake. Ideally you can be direct, but unfortunately many bosses are not receptive to this, so you have to find other ways to get your message across.

  • OK, now you tell me, after I retired.

  • "hey boss, remember what you said earlier ? I think you forgot [insert correct answer]" if your boss can't handle this, change job.

  • Good tactics to correct your boss