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Google contract workers voted to unionize. Contract workers at a Google’s Pittsburgh office voted today to join the United Steelworkers union, in what is believed to be the first instance of tech workers unionizing in the US.

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Contributions

  • As Quartz at Work's Sarah Todd reports, "Unionization efforts are still very rare among white-collar tech workers, but several employees at HCL said they hoped to set a new precedent for other workers in their field." Will this be an outlier event, or the start of a big new trend?

  • What would the potential impediments to a broader wave of unionization within the tech industry be—and what would be some of the potential attractions?

  • Do we think that the company they work for will be less competitive now and potentially lose the contract?

  • Lots of questions whith one very disturbing potential answer. What happens if Google shifts the jobs offshore? Globalization is not dead despite trade issues making it an unpopular word.

  • "in Pittsburgh," so jobs that must be in Pittsburgh, local hands-on work that must be based there because it's provided there by people there, will have this protection, every other job will move across the street.

    We really need to grasp that internet companies are not "based" somewhere. Truly not

    "in Pittsburgh," so jobs that must be in Pittsburgh, local hands-on work that must be based there because it's provided there by people there, will have this protection, every other job will move across the street.

    We really need to grasp that internet companies are not "based" somewhere. Truly not. The old models of local regulation need to die as things like GDPR, local policy, or this city unionization, only serve to remind us that too many lack grasping that Google is global, online, everywhere and nowhere.

    And these local level regulations HINDER new small business and competition, because they too are online. Startups and founders can't possibly conceive of the thousands of local laws and regulations they are likely violating by simply being online. I appreciate that people have good intentions, but it's government, despite its rhetoric and inquiry, that's enabling "Big Tech," by keeping it ever more difficult for anyone to succeed with alternatives.

    The internet dawned not just the Information Age but a global adoption of Liberty - everyone, anywhere, CAN access it, CAN start a website, and CAN start a business... Unless local government prevents it. It's time for massive deregulation and public education that if we don't like what business does, it's our own responsibility (no, our obligation) to vote against it with our dollars, and stop looking to laws to protect us from the world.

  • Potentially a watershed moment for the tech industry. Will be interesting to see what follows both here and in the larger industry. 🤔

  • Unionization for the sake of better life and its effects to our world.

  • Interestingly Naver, Korea’s largest search portal by market share and local rival to Google, unionised last year with much fanfare in the industry.

    http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/pages/article.asp?newsIdx=262286