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Maya Ish Shalom

Good morning.

The world in 50 years

Will our world be more equal or less equal? Hung Huang, the Chinese TV host and producer, predicts: “It will be worse before it gets better."

The World in 50 Years: Will our world be more equal or less equal?

Perhaps I missed it, but how do you define equal? Without knowing that, how meaningfully can anyone answer the question?

It may well get worse first; in some ways, we’re living through that now (e.g. global wealth, by many measures, is increasingly being consolidated by the 1%).

It’s worth noting, though, that our standards for equality will probably be different in 50 years. Just as many forms of today’s equality did

It may well get worse first; in some ways, we’re living through that now (e.g. global wealth, by many measures, is increasingly being consolidated by the 1%).

It’s worth noting, though, that our standards for equality will probably be different in 50 years. Just as many forms of today’s equality did not exist in popular culture in 1969, we will likely have a greater range of expression when we speak of equality in 2069. However, implementation of these ideas will not be so quick; even if the world becomes more equal by today’s standards, it may well look less equal to the standards of 2069.

How we move

A country’s commuting behavior impacts its media. A reliance on public transit in India has provided an opportunity for short video apps like TikTok and Firework. In comparison, podcasts have gobbled up the media landscape in the car-dependent US.

Long commutes make India perfect for short video apps like TikTok

Q: Why are podcasts so popular in the US?

A: The way we commute affects what media we consume.

Cars = podcasts; Bus/train = video

Here's a closer look at the scene in India.

Even when Indians use cars, many middle class and rich ones have drivers, so they end up watching videos. Podcasts have become popular only among elite, urban folks.

Rules for the rich

Sneaker strategy

Who’s got your data?

You could be reading this a lot more quickly

You've got actual mail

The dread of unsolicited email is fueling the revival of stationery. Getting a long email you’ll feel obligated to answer? Ugh. Getting a handwritten letter in the mail? Heck yes, and it’s coming back.

The dread of unsolicited email is fueling the revival of personal stationery

Oh hooray! What a hole in the market this was. Most personalized stationery is either prohibitively expensive or oddly generic. I've been writing more letters lately and have gotten such appreciative replies from the recipients. And while isn't the point, I've found it to be such a satisfying way to

Oh hooray! What a hole in the market this was. Most personalized stationery is either prohibitively expensive or oddly generic. I've been writing more letters lately and have gotten such appreciative replies from the recipients. And while isn't the point, I've found it to be such a satisfying way to reflect on my own feelings for someone special, and communicate them in an unhurried way (that can in turn be consumed on someone's own terms). These are going to look really nice with some Ellsworth Kelly stamps.

News news

Global terrorism

Hollywood heavyweights

He may not be Mister Rogers, but he’s not far off. The New York Times admits that telling saintly stories about legitimately saintly celebrities doesn’t make for the most exciting stories, but in this case, it’s the only available option.

This Tom Hanks Story Will Help You Feel Less Bad

'Spielberg once said about him, “If Norman Rockwell were alive today, he would paint a portrait of Tom.”'

That, along with new knowledge on how he's related to ABRAHAM LINCOLN, just gets you all more warmed up for this wonderful profile of the esteemed actor.

Also:

"It was then that he [Tom Junod

'Spielberg once said about him, “If Norman Rockwell were alive today, he would paint a portrait of Tom.”'

That, along with new knowledge on how he's related to ABRAHAM LINCOLN, just gets you all more warmed up for this wonderful profile of the esteemed actor.

Also:

"It was then that he [Tom Junod] met Mister Rogers, who prayed for him and his family every day, and who kept a file on Junod, which the screenwriters, Micah Fitzerman-Blue and Noah Harpster, found in Rogers’ archives in Pittsburgh. In that file, he laid out four pillars of journalism that he hoped Junod would stick to: 1. Journalists are human beings not stenographers, human beings not automatons. 2. Point out injustice when you have to. 3. Point out beauty when you can. 4. Be aware of celebrating the wonders of creation."

Sincerely, Quartz

Close

The Steve Jobs speech that made Silicon Valley obsessed with pirates. In the early 1980s, Steve Jobs delivered a speech to Apple employees that included a metaphor about pirates. Since then, startups and tech companies have embraced the tale, while simultaneously misinterpreting it.

Read more on Quartz

From Our Members

  • Technology has opened different doors that make this happen. Remember Napster? It opened the door to music subscriptions and looking at music distribution in a different way, while breaking nearly all the rules in the industry.

    To me, Jobs understood the Sillicon Valley ethos long before it became

    Technology has opened different doors that make this happen. Remember Napster? It opened the door to music subscriptions and looking at music distribution in a different way, while breaking nearly all the rules in the industry.

    To me, Jobs understood the Sillicon Valley ethos long before it became mainstream. He was one of the original pirates, before it became cool to want to break the way things have worked. I suppose there’s an allure to the notion of being iconoclastic, and Jobs inspired that within Apple’s walls.

  • Great article. There is an investor-fueled myth that being a “pirate” is required. Surely, no one gets to define new categories without challenging the status quo. But pirates will be more effective if they can scale like the navy... that’s where the big returns come from.

    I’ve had the opportunity

    Great article. There is an investor-fueled myth that being a “pirate” is required. Surely, no one gets to define new categories without challenging the status quo. But pirates will be more effective if they can scale like the navy... that’s where the big returns come from.

    I’ve had the opportunity to advise some startups and have seen the gamut of overly ambitious with no execution to the opposite end of purely tactical with no bigger ambition. Neither extreme is the place to be over the long term.

    But from a cultural perspective, I agree, perhaps new symbols are needed to enable a culture that challenges rules while respectful of individuals...

  • It's a tale as old as time: scrappy, innovative outsider becomes the establishment, and the ethos that helped make them that way becomes warped by copycats. The phrase is a perfect microcosm for the tech industry as a whole.

  • Jobs was being literal about pirates. According to Wikipedia Jobs misled Atari, lied to Wozniak so he could rip him off and broke laws selling blue boxes to phone phreaks.

    Lying stealing greed and a willingness to break the law sounds like a pirate.

    Don't understand the confusion.

  • Beautiful article.

    Seems that some of the Valley’s ideals and identities are facing an inevitable turning point.

    You can’t stay a young kid that likes to take risks forever. Doesn’t mean you need to become an adult so boring that he never takes risks no more.

    So what will their new identity be?