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Alessandro Cripsta

Good morning.

Today in impeachment

When superpowers collide

Confronting inequality

Taking the top job

Google vs. Oracle

Democratic...and demographic divisions

A new poll suggests which Democrat could bridge the generational divide in 2020. Three septuagenarians are leading the race to challenge Donald Trump. Their ability to appeal to both young and old voters will determine who comes out on top, and the numbers show Warren's doing the most.

New poll shows Elizabeth Warren could bridge the Democrats’ generational divide

One very interesting finding from our poll is that nearly half of voters under 30 aren't backing any of the three frontrunners, which means young people could be primary kingmakers if they settle on an alternative to Biden.

No specifics on the poll you're touting? It includes Pete Buttigieg and Kamala Harris and not Andrew Yang despite him beating both of them in several recent polls?

Sustainable agriculture

Toilet wars

Scam season

Victims were targeted with scare tactics. They included ads warning of impending economic crises, the dangers of the deep state, and potential account freezes. All mixed with political disinformation referencing politicians like Trump and Warren and their parties.

The scare tactics used to sell overpriced silver to older conservatives

On reading this story, I reached out to my father-in-law and learned he too had seen these ads in his feed and had been tempted to call. This is fraud, in my view, and reading through the scripts the sales people use was chilling. I encouraged him to reach out to the Quartz investigations team -- and

On reading this story, I reached out to my father-in-law and learned he too had seen these ads in his feed and had been tempted to call. This is fraud, in my view, and reading through the scripts the sales people use was chilling. I encouraged him to reach out to the Quartz investigations team -- and to alert his peers to this ruse. If you have loved ones in their 70s or 80s, it's important for you to help educate them about these sorts of tactics. Yes, the companies should do more, but we also have to take some of the responsibility for not falling for this crap. Sharing this story with them is one good way to start.

Gaming's next frontier

Google Stadia is not the cloud gaming future we were promised. A less-than-perfect launch reveals the limits of streaming games.

Google Stadia is not the cloud gaming future we were promised

I really want the future Google and others are envisioning—where I can play games that used to require me to be tethered to a PC or console—wherever I am. It seems like a no-brainer move gaming into the cloud, much like we've done with music and movies, but streaming games is an entirely different prospect

I really want the future Google and others are envisioning—where I can play games that used to require me to be tethered to a PC or console—wherever I am. It seems like a no-brainer move gaming into the cloud, much like we've done with music and movies, but streaming games is an entirely different prospect. Latency nears to be as close to zero as possible, so that the game isn't jarring and you can actually play it, and networks need to be able to handle the large bandwidth streaming interactive high-resolution requires. Beyond the lackluster games on offer, Stadia seems to fall down on its core technology. But it's still early days. Hopefully Google can work out the kinks.

Not to be a Google defender, but these early hiccups seem excusable. We're only on day 2 of Stadia's public launch and early adopters can help iron out the bugs. If lag ruins the experience, Stadia will lose users, sure, but Google has every incentive to make it work. For now, the platform seems aspirational

Not to be a Google defender, but these early hiccups seem excusable. We're only on day 2 of Stadia's public launch and early adopters can help iron out the bugs. If lag ruins the experience, Stadia will lose users, sure, but Google has every incentive to make it work. For now, the platform seems aspirational but I can get behind Google's vision for the video game industry (even if that means using a wired controller). As a gamer, all I care about is speed, so I hope Google figures it out quick.

If Google can attract gamers from diverse backgrounds, then it might create a different target experience in the interim (until internet speed is not an issue). They can focus on narrative experience based games, such as Until Dawn or Heavy Rain, where you can sit back and think about your choices rather

If Google can attract gamers from diverse backgrounds, then it might create a different target experience in the interim (until internet speed is not an issue). They can focus on narrative experience based games, such as Until Dawn or Heavy Rain, where you can sit back and think about your choices rather than playing on reaction speed. Maybe even integrate simple technologies to ease the gameplay more, like assisted initial reaction or such. Story driven, strategic gameplays have a customer base with great demographics for Stadia: high income with limited time!

Hopefully, Google's iterative approach to product development will iron out the initial kinks over the coming months, while also encouraging infrastructure providers (ISP's etc) to step-up their rollout of improvements to networking in anticipation an increase in interest on online gaming.

Virtual reality is too boring. Fast Company writes that developers haven’t given us a good enough reason to leave our own realities behind in favor of their artificial worlds.

The big problem with virtual reality? It’s almost as boring as real life

I feel like this article only focuses on the enterprise applications of VR, which of course are not for everyday people. In the wake of Valve announcing their first flagship VR game, Alyx, this article is incredibly narrow.

ETFs are eating the market

Income inequality

Those in the most unequal societies are most likely to accept income inequality. Harvard Business Review highlights research showing such citizens believe they’re living in a meritocracy and take greater pride in their place in it, especially as they move up the income ladder.

Why Do People Tolerate Income Inequality?

We're to "take pride" in what we do. What are we working toward in our work? Is it worth taking pride for without it what he have to take pride in is life being considered worthless by those who take pride in what they do. What be the issue is how easily we're considered worthless by who takes pride

We're to "take pride" in what we do. What are we working toward in our work? Is it worth taking pride for without it what he have to take pride in is life being considered worthless by those who take pride in what they do. What be the issue is how easily we're considered worthless by who takes pride in what they do so much to take pride from another; may be for doing what you do too well according to whom it may concern. Then again not taking enough pride in what you do. Again "what are we working toward in our work?" when money is not the issue. What can we do to achieve all money can buy since money just buys our time so we spen time spending money so others too can spend time doing the same. What can we say & do worth more than all money can buy?

I will always love you, boss

We want nothing...except for you to come back soon.

Close

Our colleague, mentor, and friend. Lauren Brown, one of the founding editors of Quartz, was a thoughtful and influential practitioner in this decisive era for digital media. We’re deeply saddened by her passing this week at the age of 37.

Read more on Quartz

From Our Members

  • Lauren’s biggest impact on me was what she taught me about how to lead at Quartz: believe in people, advocate for them, champion their work (to others) and their abilities (to themselves), be honest and direct, ask hard questions, uphold high standards, have compassion, and embrace empathy. When I was

    Lauren’s biggest impact on me was what she taught me about how to lead at Quartz: believe in people, advocate for them, champion their work (to others) and their abilities (to themselves), be honest and direct, ask hard questions, uphold high standards, have compassion, and embrace empathy. When I was applying for managing editor, I remember worrying to my friends that I would lose my Quartz friendships, that people wouldn’t want to have a beer or a casual chat with me, because I’d become the person nagging them about one responsibility or another. I don’t think anyone more than Lauren showed me how those two aspects of being a good colleague don’t have to compete—that they can coexist and actually serve each other, that you can passionately debate a special project one minute and share cute cat photos or nightmarish dating stories the next. I love her for that, and will miss her dearly.

  • Lauren truly loved Quartz, and Quartz truly loved her back. When we were matching the most recent pairs of mentors and mentees for Quartz Corps, our in-house mentorship program, she was ~by far~ the mentor most in demand; so many people requested her directly, and everyone on the committee handling the

    Lauren truly loved Quartz, and Quartz truly loved her back. When we were matching the most recent pairs of mentors and mentees for Quartz Corps, our in-house mentorship program, she was ~by far~ the mentor most in demand; so many people requested her directly, and everyone on the committee handling the pairings had someone in their group—whether in the newsroom or on one of our sales and marketing teams—whom they wanted to see mentored by her. It was such a testament to how beloved and admired she was here, and to how that admiration stretched across our entire company. I’m wearing my Quartz hoodie today in her honor.

  • The one thing I remember Lauren imparting to me about Quartz during my 2014 job interview was about the Atlantic's code of conduct. (It was Quartz's parent company then.) I remember her telling me it was two things: Rigor of Intellect, which she described basically as being as challenged/excited as you

    The one thing I remember Lauren imparting to me about Quartz during my 2014 job interview was about the Atlantic's code of conduct. (It was Quartz's parent company then.) I remember her telling me it was two things: Rigor of Intellect, which she described basically as being as challenged/excited as you were during your favorite class in college and Generosity of Spirit, which she described as meaning we were all on the same team—collaborators not competitors—and, essentially, “don’t be an asshole.” I must have raised my eyebrows (because, awesome) and she said in that very straightforward Lauren way: “It sounds like bullshit, but it’s not.” That code could have easily been just another of many documents I signed on my first day at Quartz, but because of Lauren, it made a huge impression and stuck with me. I’m so grateful to my colleagues for making it true all the time, and to Lauren for telling me how important it was to begin with.

  • I was scared of Lauren when I first joined Quartz as a lowly intern, because much like Kevin says, her standards were so high that I feared I wouldn’t be able to live up to what she saw Quartz to be. But I quickly realized that’s just because she cared so deeply about this place. She helped shaped what

    I was scared of Lauren when I first joined Quartz as a lowly intern, because much like Kevin says, her standards were so high that I feared I wouldn’t be able to live up to what she saw Quartz to be. But I quickly realized that’s just because she cared so deeply about this place. She helped shaped what Quartz has become, and deeply impacted many of its writers’ voices. She once told me, completely out of left field, that she thought I was doing great work. She was the first person at Quartz who truly made me felt welcome, and living up to her expectations brought me immense pride. She always told you exactly how she felt, and she wasn’t afraid of anyone. She will be so missed.

  • Lauren, our colleague Colette, and I would obsess about fun nail art together—often sending each other designs on Instagram and swinging by each other's desks after a manicure. One time we came across a picture of a nail design that spelt the words Girl King across someone’s fingers and we immediately

    Lauren, our colleague Colette, and I would obsess about fun nail art together—often sending each other designs on Instagram and swinging by each other's desks after a manicure. One time we came across a picture of a nail design that spelt the words Girl King across someone’s fingers and we immediately fell in love with the phrase. While at the time it was a fun title to align ourselves with, a sassy Slack bio, and a way of saying that we get shit done—looking at it now I realize that Lauren really was a King.

    She was a force. People listened when she spoke (even if it was in her infamous baby voice). She was an advisor, a role model, and championed for underrepresented voices. She had high expectations for the people around her and inspired so many of us to be better. She was protective, caring, creative, and fun; and like all true Kings, is leaving behind a legacy.

    I feel lucky to have known Lauren both as a professional and a friend—she often blurred the line. Our Slack exchanges are a mix of files she edited for me, cat and niece photos, updates on dating, nail art, plans to hangout together in our neighborhood, words of encouragement and affirmations. I started at Quartz while finishing up grad school and I often feel like I grew up here. Lauren witnessed my growth, cheered me on, and even managed me at one point. She took me under her wing and helped shape who I am here today.

    I will miss her energy, guidance, eclectic fashion choices, and most of all—her friendship.

  • Not long after joining Quartz, I promised a colleague I'd go to a networking event he had arranged. Being inherently rather shy, I'm terrible at these things, and found myself standing awkwardly at the side, trying to force myself to go and talk to someone. Luckily for me, Lauren was there. She and I

    Not long after joining Quartz, I promised a colleague I'd go to a networking event he had arranged. Being inherently rather shy, I'm terrible at these things, and found myself standing awkwardly at the side, trying to force myself to go and talk to someone. Luckily for me, Lauren was there. She and I had never had a proper conversation before, but she saw me standing alone, came up and gave me a big hug, and lamented that we'd never really spoken. We chatted for ages, ignoring the event's stated goal of mingling. Among other things, she told me how she considered Quartz a family, and, despite there being other cool media opportunities around, said, "I could never leave Quartz."

  • There are so many things I could say about Lauren, who was my first editor at Quartz and biggest champion, and became the rare kind of friend we get to consider family. As I told her often, especially lately, I know much of my life in New York, a life I love, is the way it is because of Lauren. I owe

    There are so many things I could say about Lauren, who was my first editor at Quartz and biggest champion, and became the rare kind of friend we get to consider family. As I told her often, especially lately, I know much of my life in New York, a life I love, is the way it is because of Lauren. I owe her, in many ways, my career (she would always say that wasn't true, but I think, and hope, she knew it was). She fought to get me hired, believed in my talent when I didn't, and pushed me to be the best version of myself always (I used to have dreams about her rejecting my excuses for all sorts of stuff, and I hope I will continue to have them).

    When I landed at JFK today, and learned my dearest friend had passed away, the first place I thought to go was not home. It was the office. That's Lauren's doing. Her essence is forever encapsulated, for me, in the way Quartz feels like a family and a caring community. A place of love. Lauren poured so much of herself in here, and she will live forever in what Quartz stands for—ideas, intellect, and perhaps most of all boundless generosity.

  • Lauren was one of the first people I worked with at Quartz—she gave second (quite drastic) edits on a freelance story I had been working on with Georgia. I remember thinking at the time that, over email, she seemed uncompromising, direct, and kind, above all—all laudable things to be.

    When I started

    Lauren was one of the first people I worked with at Quartz—she gave second (quite drastic) edits on a freelance story I had been working on with Georgia. I remember thinking at the time that, over email, she seemed uncompromising, direct, and kind, above all—all laudable things to be.

    When I started at Quartz properly later on, I realized that this first impression perhaps wasn't too far off the mark, but that I could not possibly have grasped how deep her commitment was to her work and to Quartz. I'm sad and sorry that I didn't get to know her better, and moved to hear so many other stories of how much she meant to the people who worked with, and loved, her throughout her long tenure here.

  • Lauren was my official mentor through the Quartz mentorship program (and I know realize how in demand my role as her mentee was!), but also quickly became my friend. She taught me how to have confidence in sharing my ideas, how to fearlessly make decisions, and how to build my own path to find happiness

    Lauren was my official mentor through the Quartz mentorship program (and I know realize how in demand my role as her mentee was!), but also quickly became my friend. She taught me how to have confidence in sharing my ideas, how to fearlessly make decisions, and how to build my own path to find happiness at Quartz. Even when she was in and out of the hospital, she always found time to provide mentorship moments, both formally, by forcing me to check in on my goals with her, and informally, by being a fierce friend through everything.

    She also gave me wise advice on how to navigate competing interests in the workplace: ignore everyone else and trust your own instinct. It's probably the most "Lauren" advice I could have ever taken to heart.

    I will miss her cheering me on, slacking me animal pics, and texting me to hurry up and watch the bachelorette so we could talk about how silly, uncomfortable, or on-point it was. Lauren always sent me the sparkly heart emoji, it will forever remind me of her sparkly heart and soul. 💖

  • Lauren was the first person I ever met at Quartz - long before my first interview. She gave me time to chat, even though there wasn't a job opening and I was living in another country. Looking back, it's incredible how caring she was to so many. I remember working together one Sunday and the subways

    Lauren was the first person I ever met at Quartz - long before my first interview. She gave me time to chat, even though there wasn't a job opening and I was living in another country. Looking back, it's incredible how caring she was to so many. I remember working together one Sunday and the subways stopped working and she told me to expense an uber so I could come over and we could hang out together. And, as so many others have mentioned, her writing is beautiful. She made it clear that there are many people suffering and going through challenges that are out of step from daily, normal concerns. She influenced so many and is deeply missed.

  • I remember meeting Lauren during her BI days and as she moved to help start Quartz. She was a blast of energy and cared deeply on building the right story and fueling readers' desire to learn. This news is heartbreaking, sending all my love over to the Quartz HQ and her family.

  • Lauren’s been my close friend, collaborator, mentor, occasional manager, and consistent champion ever since my first week at Quartz when we were thrown together to bring her first special project into the world. Being exposed to and entrusted with Lauren’s brilliance up close has permanently changed

    Lauren’s been my close friend, collaborator, mentor, occasional manager, and consistent champion ever since my first week at Quartz when we were thrown together to bring her first special project into the world. Being exposed to and entrusted with Lauren’s brilliance up close has permanently changed the way I see the world, and the way in which I go out to meet it. She taught me to be brave, ignore bullshit, and think ambitiously, all while working and living with deep compassion. Lauren was raw and unapologetic about her intensity, intelligence, and desires, and loved the ideas and people at Quartz fiercely. I’ve never met someone so generous with themselves -- she sheltered me and fought for me when my personal and professional lives crumbled, even when I wish she’d kept some of the fight for herself. I’m used to daily life entangled with Lauren, and have spent so much of this year already missing her terribly, but am grateful to be surrounded by people who carry her spirit forward.

  • I read regularly obituaries. They reflect so well personal achievements through life. However, it is so sad to read the obituary of a young, talented and passionated person. Rest in peace Lauren Brown.

  • Very sad story, but a wonderful article. Thanks for the detailed obituary. Very touching.

  • Beautiful writing on a very sad occasion. Lauren sounds like an incredible leader, friend, and advocate; it's clear that her loss has deeply affected her friends and colleagues. I hope you'll take solace from knowing that she helped build an amazing, valuable, and reliable online platform that stands

    Beautiful writing on a very sad occasion. Lauren sounds like an incredible leader, friend, and advocate; it's clear that her loss has deeply affected her friends and colleagues. I hope you'll take solace from knowing that she helped build an amazing, valuable, and reliable online platform that stands in stark contrast to the swamp of news elsewhere on the web. My thoughts are with the Quartz team and Lauren's family today.