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The dread of unsolicited email is fueling the revival of stationery. Getting a long email you’ll feel obligated to answer? Ugh. Getting a handwritten letter in the mail? Heck yes, and it’s coming back.

Read more on Quartz

Featured contributions

  • Oh hooray! What a hole in the market this was. Most personalized stationery is either prohibitively expensive or oddly generic. I've been writing more letters lately and have gotten such appreciative replies from the recipients. And while isn't the point, I've found it to be such a satisfying way to

    Oh hooray! What a hole in the market this was. Most personalized stationery is either prohibitively expensive or oddly generic. I've been writing more letters lately and have gotten such appreciative replies from the recipients. And while isn't the point, I've found it to be such a satisfying way to reflect on my own feelings for someone special, and communicate them in an unhurried way (that can in turn be consumed on someone's own terms). These are going to look really nice with some Ellsworth Kelly stamps.

  • A handwritten note or letter are so unexpected these days; it’s definitely a zig to everyone else’s zag.

    It’s cool that there are some fresh entrants into the personal stationery realm (a niche a bit less stuffy than ascot purveyors but not as hip as those urban cycling-friendly, slim-fit pants a millennial

    A handwritten note or letter are so unexpected these days; it’s definitely a zig to everyone else’s zag.

    It’s cool that there are some fresh entrants into the personal stationery realm (a niche a bit less stuffy than ascot purveyors but not as hip as those urban cycling-friendly, slim-fit pants a millennial could wear in the office), but aside from a very brief naming of two old-school and four ‘upstart’ brands, this piece read like the intro was simply just enough pretense of an actual article to allow for the subsequent regurgitation of what must be Maurèle’s press releases/marketing copy/brand positioning statements.

    My gut says this brand is a bit too formulaic; their product far too expensive. While the provenance of such twee and intellectually-fussy papers (because the product itself is of-course sleek and spare) is sure to delight a certain crowd, for whom this clumsy ‘aping’ of iconic (and incredibly unique) artists just kind of backfires, by handily illustrating their own lack of much substance, personal style, or distinction.

    So one wonders: Paid content? Advertising format experimentation? Overly smitten and inexperienced intern? Or did the PR flack ply you with food and drinks via a handwritten invitation on Maurèle correspondence cards?