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Lorenzo Gritti

Good evening.

Canopy branches out

The future of finance

Solving the climate crisis

The way we colonize Mars says a lot about how we address climate change. Is repeating our mistakes on another planet the answer to our existential crises?

The problems we’re solving for on Earth will only follow us to Mars

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin pumps, solar cells, artificial limbs to name a few). So in my mind, it’s only worth spending all this money on getting to and living on Mars, if in doing so, we develop technology that also helps us solve all our very real problems here on Earth.

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

A world in the streets

How Gen Z is changing Tinder

Wheels up

Disrupting dementia

Next-generation dementia care could learn from cancer care. Palliative care helps patients in their final months, and is often used for people suffering from end-stage cancer. But it can actually help anyone who has a long-term, chronic illness, and it could be especially effective for people living with dementia. ✦

Next-generation dementia care could learn a lesson from cancer care

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice, which is a form of palliative care for the last six months of a person's life. Hospice, however, is a form of palliative care, which in general just means person-centered care. Sometimes, this means using life-saving interventions, like antibiotics for an infection. Other times, it means just making sue the person is comfortable. It depends on what the person and their caregivers want.

Palliative care could save dementia care, which is the more expensive in the last five years of life than cancer and heart disease. It could also save health care in general; it's cheaper than the current care systems in place. The trouble is, because it was historically used for cancer treatment, that's how most doctors think of it. Luckily, a few hospitals are testing out palliative care. If their results are good, it could expand nation-wide.

The rising price of immigration

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

The most wonderful time of the year?

The real life Irishman

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Kavanaugh’s first SCOTUS speech. While the justice joked and got choked up during his remarks, activists screened the Senate testimony of his rape accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, in a public space outside the venue.

Read more on Quartz

Contributions

  • I have been eagerly anticipating Brett Kavanaugh's first public speech since becoming a SCOTUS justice because I wanted to see if he'd acknowledge his harrowing confirmation process or leave it all behind. He didn't shirk the issue but he also tried to be upbeat and utterly reasonable, making his theme "gratitude."