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Millennials would rather stay in, thanks. What does the outside world provide that a bubble bath and Netflix—not to mention the gratification of posting about both on social media—don’t?

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  • If you're home alone and posting on social media...are you really home alone? Did you reap the same benefits as you would have in true solitude? I'm really asking.

  • I consider this trend a personal victory against the grownups who insisted I should play outside with other kids, when I was growing up

  • A key thing about introverts that psychologists always stress is that they don't so much want to be "alone" as much as they want to be with a select group of people with whom they feel comfortable. All of the things that we end up doing alone at home, we could technically be doing with a group of close

    A key thing about introverts that psychologists always stress is that they don't so much want to be "alone" as much as they want to be with a select group of people with whom they feel comfortable. All of the things that we end up doing alone at home, we could technically be doing with a group of close friends. You know, like watching a TV show on Netflix, facepacks etc (maybe not the bubble bath, unless your group of close friends is REALLY close). But I guess what technology has also done is made it harder to really connect with people and siloed city life doesn't help either. Sigh, it's another case of the chicken and the desperate need for some connection.

  • Perhaps this goes without saying, but city life is expensive for millennials. Those bars, restaurants and Art Gallery biennales don't come cheap, and if you're tired from hustling to pay rent and groceries (and Netflix, and Spotify, and Uber...) why would you spend more money on luxuries like public eating and drinking?

  • If this is true: "millennials are staying in more often not out of some pure love for hygge, but because they’re overworked, tired, stressed about the state of the world, and too broke to afford a big night out, anyway." How much does this get amplified when they are middle aged and have kids, mortgages

    If this is true: "millennials are staying in more often not out of some pure love for hygge, but because they’re overworked, tired, stressed about the state of the world, and too broke to afford a big night out, anyway." How much does this get amplified when they are middle aged and have kids, mortgages and car payments (and need to save for retirement)? sigh..

  • Having a “fun night in” is cheaper, easier, safer, completely in your control, and did I mention cheaper? What’s not to love? Now if I could only find someone to share it with...

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