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AI-enhanced brains are no longer science fiction. But such developments carry big risks, especially for security, surveillance, and privacy.

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  • It's fun to discuss the ramifications of a non-existent technology, but brain implants are very problematic. Yes, people have had them, and there are many cases of those people then interfacing with machines - especially prosthetics - but in every case the implant stops working after a few weeks. This

    It's fun to discuss the ramifications of a non-existent technology, but brain implants are very problematic. Yes, people have had them, and there are many cases of those people then interfacing with machines - especially prosthetics - but in every case the implant stops working after a few weeks. This problem is called Glial Encapsulation. Basically, the implant moves around in your head, just from the movements of your own body, and that tiny movement causes the implant to slightly damage the cells of the brain around it. The brain reacts to this by building a form of scar tissue around the implant, which then stops it working.

    For an in-brain implant to make sense, it first has to be accepted by the body, and for a long time. After that, we then have to be able to decode the signals coming from it. These are both unsolved problems.

    Alternatively, we can use the signal extraction and interpretation layer we have already to interface with AI - you could learn to type really fast. The same social arguments play out, more or less.

  • Important issues to be thinking about well and early. The future is only barely here, but will be more evenly and richly distributed faster that we might imagine. And even if a long time off, understanding the limiting extreme cases yields better solutions for less extreme situations that we are already

    Important issues to be thinking about well and early. The future is only barely here, but will be more evenly and richly distributed faster that we might imagine. And even if a long time off, understanding the limiting extreme cases yields better solutions for less extreme situations that we are already encountering. Moving fast and breaking things can be disastrous, as we are already seeing.

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