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Must every office phone booth feel like an upright coffin? A sealed-off stall for making private calls is a clunky solution to compensate for the architectural pitfalls of ill-conceived open-plan offices. But like it or not, they are here to stay.

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  • Lost in the headline: phone booths can make you REALLY SICK.

    I missed this part of the story at first - so please make make sure not to skim over it: "WeWork’s toxic phone booths. Last month, the beleaguered co-working company reportedly recalled 2,300 units due to elevated levels of formaldehyde

    Lost in the headline: phone booths can make you REALLY SICK.

    I missed this part of the story at first - so please make make sure not to skim over it: "WeWork’s toxic phone booths. Last month, the beleaguered co-working company reportedly recalled 2,300 units due to elevated levels of formaldehyde, a substance linked to respiratory issues and, at high levels of exposure, to cancers." #omg

  • I don't mind taking calls in these phone booths. But the only reason they have become so ubiquitous indeed is to accommodate the shortcomings of open-plan offices. Phone booths are a band-aid to fix a problem of a company's own making.

  • If I'm on my own, I try to lie down during phone meetings, because lying on the floor can be really helpful for back pain — especially compared to constant sitting in an office chair. My problem with phone booths isn't just the air, it's the rigidity of the space. Fine for a 5 minute private call, but

    If I'm on my own, I try to lie down during phone meetings, because lying on the floor can be really helpful for back pain — especially compared to constant sitting in an office chair. My problem with phone booths isn't just the air, it's the rigidity of the space. Fine for a 5 minute private call, but bad for longer calls where we could be using the time to be kind to our bodies.

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