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London bans Uber again. The city refused a new permit for the ride-sharing company, Quartz's Alison Griswold reports, after a series of disputes over safety and security, although it can still operate while appealing the decision.

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  • What's challenging about this decision is that the reasoning and decision making process is fairly opaque. The outcome is a binary "yes/no" and we have little insight into what opportunities and conditions Uber was given to resolve these issues and how responsive/unresponsive it was. As more providers

    What's challenging about this decision is that the reasoning and decision making process is fairly opaque. The outcome is a binary "yes/no" and we have little insight into what opportunities and conditions Uber was given to resolve these issues and how responsive/unresponsive it was. As more providers come to London, these types of issues are going to arise more often. The city should look to develop a transparent process that makes clear to drivers, riders and the rest of the public that operators are being given due process to resolve issues and highlights where operators are not cooperating. That would reduce misunderstanding around decisions and reduce the uncertainty that this decision creates. Press releases aren't the right way to litigate these issues in public.

  • How can a ban like this only be applied to London and not the whole UK? Don’t we have the same laws? This seems a bit odd to me and I am not sure how it will be implemented for people travelling from outside London into the city centre in an Uber taxi.

  • It’s probably quite easy to prevent Uber operating in London. Passengers trying to get into the city from elsewhere simply wouldn’t be allowed to enter a London address as their destination. Certain postcodes could be blocked. And if Uber found a way around that, it would be another major contravention.

  • This decision shows that the "Big City v Uber" battles (Paris, Austin, Copenhagen, etc) is far from resolved. I wonder what effect London's move will have on Uber investors.

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  • Just scrolling by the headline, my first thought was that a flat ban seemed a little extreme. It seems, though, that Uber has been remarkably brazen in flouting British laws— so perhaps this is what’s needed to get them to shape up. The company in general has always tried to have its cake and eat it

    Just scrolling by the headline, my first thought was that a flat ban seemed a little extreme. It seems, though, that Uber has been remarkably brazen in flouting British laws— so perhaps this is what’s needed to get them to shape up. The company in general has always tried to have its cake and eat it too.

    Edit: just looked at the other comments, and Andy Stewart raises a very good point— how DOES a ban like this work? Would people getting an Uber elsewhere in the U.K. not be allowed to enter the London city limits in it? Or would Uber drivers still be allowed to drop off in London, but not pick up? I’m sure they’ve worked this out (well, I hope so anyway— it seems the British government is as bad as ours these days) but it is an odd situation, with the potential to seriously confuse regular people. I’d like to know what’s actually the case.

  • It seems Uber has a hard time playing by the rules and the insistence that they are not a transportation provider is not helping. The passengers book and pay for their trip through UBER the don't pay Uber for its software. For fairness This UBER should satisfy all the regulations applicable to Taxis

    It seems Uber has a hard time playing by the rules and the insistence that they are not a transportation provider is not helping. The passengers book and pay for their trip through UBER the don't pay Uber for its software. For fairness This UBER should satisfy all the regulations applicable to Taxis in any jurisdiction.

    The claim that the drivers are independent contractors seems an obvious ploy to pass responsibility. Uber seems desperate to minimize costs and taxes and somehow eventually earn a profit.