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Taylor Swift called out “the unregulated world of private equity” while accepting the award for Billboard's "Woman of the Decade." She singled out financial backers in the music industry for buying and selling artists' catalogues "as if it's an app or a shoe line."

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  • Swift has always been vocal. But on the cusp of her 30th birthday she tackled a decidedly grown up topic.

  • I find it fascinating that she called out George Soros by name. There was a very dumb online patch maybe 18 months ago when she was tied to the alt right for completely made up reasons. Very stupid stuff. Yet bringing up George Soros name could see those same conversations re-opened. Ultimately I’m 100

    I find it fascinating that she called out George Soros by name. There was a very dumb online patch maybe 18 months ago when she was tied to the alt right for completely made up reasons. Very stupid stuff. Yet bringing up George Soros name could see those same conversations re-opened. Ultimately I’m 100% with Taylor about this. Those people should be ignored and a public case is being made that private equity as its currently practiced in America (Toys R Us bankruptcy, etc) is completely indefensible.

  • A lot of private equity's methodology is very similar to the way successful startups build up:

    Find the unexamined x-factors in an industry, and either acquire or build the ultimate solution.

    In this case, owning song licenses have never been touched, with some arguments leaning towards creative commons

    A lot of private equity's methodology is very similar to the way successful startups build up:

    Find the unexamined x-factors in an industry, and either acquire or build the ultimate solution.

    In this case, owning song licenses have never been touched, with some arguments leaning towards creative commons licenses (so others can also produce their own versions). But, and while I want to point out beforehand that it's ridiculous to paint the entire PE industry as these robbers, in this case, I'm with the singers and songwriters on this argument; they find other ways to make money off their music (concerts, festivals, merch, etc) because of their loose grips on their creations.

    The bigger question is, will enough major musicians push their record companies to set riders where they own a majority or all of their music? Could another label rise up and offer that and make money though other means mentioned above?

    Right now, I'm not optimistic, but Taylor's point is absolutely warranted.

  • While I certainly agree with the sentiment of artists owni their woks, the music and for that matter the entire entertainment industry is just that an industry driven by profit margins and ego. If an artist wants to keep control of their creations then the agent needs to include that in the contract

    While I certainly agree with the sentiment of artists owni their woks, the music and for that matter the entire entertainment industry is just that an industry driven by profit margins and ego. If an artist wants to keep control of their creations then the agent needs to include that in the contract. ( this might work for established artists but for those starting out probably not)

    The big name celebrities can't complain too much because it is the music industry that has made them rich.

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