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Today's technology can push a workplace breakup to breathtakingly bad places. Over the course of a year, an amateur hacker digitally terrorized his ex-girlfriend, manipulating the criminal justice system, confounding police, and forcing her into an alternate reality of his own design.

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  • The defendant in this case, Ahmad Kazzelbach, pleaded guilty today: https://www.justice.gov/usao-md/pr/pasadena-man-pleads-guilty-federal-charges-cyberstalking-and-causing-intentional-damage

    Some details came out that we didn't previously know:

    Something not mentioned in the original complaint was

    The defendant in this case, Ahmad Kazzelbach, pleaded guilty today: https://www.justice.gov/usao-md/pr/pasadena-man-pleads-guilty-federal-charges-cyberstalking-and-causing-intentional-damage

    Some details came out that we didn't previously know:

    Something not mentioned in the original complaint was the fact that, amidst all the insanity, Kazzelbach managed to get JK's health insurance canceled.

    We also now know he began making false reports to Baltimore County cops *after* Anne Arundel County prosecutors became suspicious of the fact that he wouldn't let them download the complete contents of his iPhone.

    Kazzelbach is facing a maximum sentence of five years in federal prison for cyberstalking and 10 years for intentional damage to a protected computer. Sentencing is set for May 1.

  • This is barely a hacking case in terms of the technical skills required for Kazzelbach to manipulate. The tools, such as spoofing, are nowadays accessible to anyone with a smartphone or personal computer demanding no coding skills.

    The problem is not today's technical tools have made "hacking" a common

    This is barely a hacking case in terms of the technical skills required for Kazzelbach to manipulate. The tools, such as spoofing, are nowadays accessible to anyone with a smartphone or personal computer demanding no coding skills.

    The problem is not today's technical tools have made "hacking" a common Joe act, but that our justice systems have no ability to handle, process, and verify digital evidence. Sometimes they have no willingness either.

    I had gone through similar sabotage recently myself. Only my case involves a crazy former employee instead of a mad ex-boyfriend, and it happened in Beijing, China, instead of Maryland, U.S.

    Last month I was stopped at the boarding gate when I was about to fly on a business trip. The reason was that I was under a court's restraining order of high spendings, which includes taking air flights, high-speed trains, dining at expensive restaurants, etc...

    At the moment, I was shocked and clueless and had to cancel my trip. Then I phoned a public number of the court that issued the order. After 50-minutes on hold, finally, someone was able to check my case in their database.

    Zonghe Sui, a former employee in my company, who was fired from conducting a series of serious sexual misbehaviors against 1 of our female interns in 2017, has been filing an unlawful layoff act against us ever since. Sui submitted a letter to the court recently stating that I sent him text threats and had been moving company money to personal accounts; therefore requested a restraining order on me. In this case, he didn't even need to provide 'fabricated' evidence, because according to the judge whom I spoke to, the court has insufficient resources and manpower to neither process nor verify data.

    Hence, the court would take any claims from a litigant as true until it's proven untrue by the opposite party.

    The next day I went to present my exported telephone records and bank statements to the judge to prove Sui's claim false. 2 days after, the restraining order against me was lifted.

    All in all, I was shocked by the 'causal style' of the legal system, and the 'guilty until proven innocent' approach of handling evidence, due to so-called insufficient resources and manpower.

    It is certainly an 'amusing' experience for me and a bit of taste on something that's not quite right. I think the symptom is much deeper than a simply put 'the wheels of justice turn slowly.'

    P.S.: when I went to see the judge and to prove myself innocent. He asked me the reason to fire Sui, and I explained the sexual misbehaviors. The judge looked at me and asked, 'is the intern pretty?'

  • Actually the stuff of nightmares.

  • If you found the story interesting allow me to recommend the Netflix show called “You”. It has very little to do with work or business but it’s about a stalker boyfriend and it’s crazy addictive.

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