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A CEO’s biggest concern is attracting and keeping top talent. But according to a new survey, they're strangely inattentive to issues that could help them tackle that challenge: things like building an inclusive culture, creating better performance evaluations, and ensuring equal pay.

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  • This read is surprising but also a good reminder of the work we still need to do improve diversity, inclusion and ultimately business competitiveness.

    CEOs ranked workforce diversity and equal pay for equal work as 14th and 16th on their top 19 concerns list, respectively. As the author of “Micro-Resilience,

    This read is surprising but also a good reminder of the work we still need to do improve diversity, inclusion and ultimately business competitiveness.

    CEOs ranked workforce diversity and equal pay for equal work as 14th and 16th on their top 19 concerns list, respectively. As the author of “Micro-Resilience,” I curated research on ways to leverage top talent without the “drive until you drop” mentality where people are pushed past the point of diminishing returns. I am also very involved with developing innovative ways to use tech platforms to increase inclusion to maximize all top talent.

    I challenge CEOs in 2020 to innovate and raise the inclusion bar.

  • Digital upskilling is a huge plus when it comes to keeping employees engaged. In fact, 45% of US CEOs with advanced upskilling programs reported that their efforts were very effective at improving talent acquisition and retention. Check out more insights: pwc.to/2Rf7e5f

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  • Talent attraction and retention may also be highly ranked because it’s one of the broader answers—arguably 3,4,8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 17, and 19 on this list could be facets or subsets of #1. It would actually be interesting to have CEOs rank these same responses based on how important they consider

    Talent attraction and retention may also be highly ranked because it’s one of the broader answers—arguably 3,4,8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 17, and 19 on this list could be facets or subsets of #1. It would actually be interesting to have CEOs rank these same responses based on how important they consider each one specifically *for* attracting and retaining talent, then compare their answers to employees’.

    (Btw “other” is definitely office snacks.)

  • Given the huge amount of time, effort and money that businesses spend on recruiting talent, I’m always fascinated by how much less attention they pay to retention. In my experience of building teams, creating a sense of belonging for all your people where they can be their ‘authentic selves’ has got

    Given the huge amount of time, effort and money that businesses spend on recruiting talent, I’m always fascinated by how much less attention they pay to retention. In my experience of building teams, creating a sense of belonging for all your people where they can be their ‘authentic selves’ has got to be the number one thing to get right. A close second and third are clarity of strategy and purpose, and allowing employees as much agency as possible. Retention is about far more than the blunt instrument of a pay bump, and just because there’s a queue to your door, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be doing your utmost to ensure they don’t walk straight out again.

  • It's like a corporate Dunning-Kruger effect.

  • Issue is that CEOs are often too distant from the reality of their teams. They tend to not realize that basic issues like #pay or #equity are still concerns in many companies.

  • Of course attracting talent is important, but keeping your own talents doubly-so. And it is not really rocket-science.