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California man undergoes world-first gene editing procedure

By South China Morning Post

Kevin Madeux received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spotRead full story

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  • Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done on Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot.

  • I think about all the ways this could be used to eradicate horrible genetic diseases for which there are no cures — from Cystic Fibrosis to Muscular Dystrophy. Science and art, R&D and creativity go hand-in-hand. Good luck to this man...

  • This is both wondrous and scary. Grafting onto DNA using invisible mending is an incredible step.

    As I understand it, there is no going back and no way to fix any mistakes that occur in this field. However, the promise, especially in relation to preventing Metabolic diseases, means gene editing’s upside is too great to ignore. We are becoming capable of truly remarkable things as a race, but will invariably find ourselves facing new moral questions about what does, or doesn’t do, more harm than good.

  • Think about the possibilities here ... we are not playing with mother nature, instead we are trying to fix mother nature’s errors. From diseases like Hunter syndrome where there can be a slow cognitive decline to other genetic diseases that affect metabolism or even development. Imagine if we could somehow inactivate the extra chromosome in Down’s syndrome and allow those kids a different future. I think this is more about helping people who have no other option to have a better life than about playing

    Think about the possibilities here ... we are not playing with mother nature, instead we are trying to fix mother nature’s errors. From diseases like Hunter syndrome where there can be a slow cognitive decline to other genetic diseases that affect metabolism or even development. Imagine if we could somehow inactivate the extra chromosome in Down’s syndrome and allow those kids a different future. I think this is more about helping people who have no other option to have a better life than about playing God -as is true with most things humans create, it can be used for good or bad purposes (just consider nuclear research)... it’s our job to make it good!

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