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The death of the MBA

By Axios

U.S. graduate business schools — once magnets for American and international students seeking a certain route to a high income — are in an existential crisis. They are losing droves of students whoRead full story

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  • I’m bias coming from the entrepreneurial side of it but I did get MBA and I got more out of my first internship of real world experiences. I recommend people save their money and save to get themselves in a good personal finance situation. That allows you to make better decisions based on long term success and not needing short term compensation.

  • For a long time, most MBA programs have not been worth it. My advice: Either go to a top school or don't bother. Saddling yourself with debt for a meager return is exactly the thing you learn not to do in an MBA program. If there's no ROI don't do it.

  • Ernie Sander
    Ernie SanderDirector of Platform Community at Quartz

    Same thing is happening at law schools, of course: people no longer want to go into huge debt for degrees that in the end may not help them find jobs. I get that part. My big question is: What has happened to all these jobs that used to be filled by MBAs from second- and third- tier schools? Have those jobs been cut? Have they been outsourced overseas? Are these companies doing just fine with college graduates now and deciding that MBAs are unnecessary?

  • Maybe the really smart ones know to avoid saddling themselves with even more student debt.

  • I agree, an MBA not worth it if it’s not from a top school, and even then only worth it if you go to Wall Street or into consulting or get onto the path for a C-level position in a big firm. You are just paying for the signaling effect and the access to the recruiting activities. So if you don’t want to go that direction it really is a waste of money. A lot of people in Silicon Valley are saying that taking your startup through an accelerator is a good substitute for an MBA.

  • Peter Green
    Peter GreenFounder at FoodMakers.NYC

    With tuition, living expenses, and lost income for the time spent in school, earning an MBA can cost as much as a quarter-million dollars. Probably worth it when that will be your annual salary a few years after graduation. But the lower-tier schools don't necessarily open the doors to top-tier jobs. Much of what I learned (at a top-tier business school) about markets and accounting was outmoded the day class was over. One solution may be the same one being considered at many second-tier law schools: cut a year off the curriculum.

  • Jun Kato
    Jun KatoNewsPicks Inc (JP)

    The discussion may not be limited to MBA.

    In the past, higher education was something special, where you can receive only when you are wealthy or gifted. Having a place where those people gather will also be a good networking place.

    Along with development, higher education became popular. This is good in a sense that more people have access to knowledge, and that being the driver for development. However, by definition, more people having it, it is becoming a commodity.

    Still the top grad/undergrad

    The discussion may not be limited to MBA.

    In the past, higher education was something special, where you can receive only when you are wealthy or gifted. Having a place where those people gather will also be a good networking place.

    Along with development, higher education became popular. This is good in a sense that more people have access to knowledge, and that being the driver for development. However, by definition, more people having it, it is becoming a commodity.

    Still the top grad/undergrad school has the flavor of the past, but maybe in general, education may have become a too much of a commodity.

    I don't mean that education is not valuable, but whether what you get and what you pay is having a sufficient balance.

  • Technology is disrupting education across the board, and there has never been a doubt in my mind the MBA would be the first to go. Interesting to see the cracks starting to show.

  • Don Jones
    Don JonesPwC

    Higher educations’ degrees are just a signal in the job market. The programs themselves won’t make you better anyway.

  • US mid-tier MBAs are down, but others (global MBAs and elite US) are still okay.

  • Michi Kaifu
    Michi Kaifu

    I definitely learned a lot of valuable things at MBA, and I believe it still holds true. It is just the uber high cost that makes the whole ROI problematic.

  • n a
    n amanager at TT group

    A lot of people evaluate the MBA as intelligence not high business skill to earn money.

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